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Prohibition Is the Obvious Cause of Opioid Crisis as CDC Releases Preliminary Casualty #'s for 2

Written by Dr. Jeffrey Singer Subject: Drugs and Medications

Earlier this month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released preliminary estimates of the opioid overdose rate for 2017. The total overdose rate rose to approximately 72,000, up from a total overdose rate of 63,600 in 2016, an increase of roughly 10 percent. The total overdose rate includes deaths from numerous drugs in addition to opioids, such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and benzodiazepines. The opioid-related overdose rate increased as well, from a little over 42,000 in 2016 to over 49,000 in 2017. This increase occurred despite a 4 percent drop in heroin overdoses and a 2 percent drop in overdoses due to prescription opioids. A 37 percent increase in illicit fentanyl-related overdoses explains the jump in the death rate.

All of this is happening while the prescribing of high-dose opioids continues to decrease dramatically—over 41 percent between 2010 and 2015, with a recent report showing a further decrease of 16 percent during the year 2017.

This is more evidence, if any more was needed, that the opioid overdose problem is the result of non-medical users accessing drugs in the black market that results from drug prohibition. Whether these users' drug of choice is OxyContin or heroin, the majority have obtained their drugs through the black market, not from a doctor. A 2007 study by Carise, et al in the American Journal of Psychiatry looked at over 27,000 OxyContin addicts entering rehab between the years 2001 and 2004 and found that 78 percent never obtained a prescription from a doctor but got the drugs through a friend, family member, or a dealer. 86 percent said they took the drug to "get high" or get a "buzz." 78 percent also had a prior history of treatment for substance abuse disorder. And the National Survey on Drug Use and Health has repeatedly found roughly three-quarters of non-medical users get their drugs from dealers, family, or friends as opposed to a doctor.

Media and policymakers can't disabuse themselves of the false narrative that the opioid problem is the product of doctors hooking their patients on opioids when they treat their pain, despite the large number of studies showing–and the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse stating—that opioids used in the medical setting have a very low addiction rate. Therefore, most opioid policy has focused on decreasing the number of pills prescribed. Reducing the number of pills also aims at making less available for "diversion" into the black market. This is making many patients suffer from undertreatment of their pain and causes some, in desperation, to turn to the black market or to suicide.

Since 2010, opioid policy has also promoted the development of abuse-deterrent formulations of opioids—opioids that cannot be crushed and snorted or dissolved and injected. As a just-released Cato Research Brief as well as my Policy Analysis from earlier this year have shown, rendering prescription opioids unsuitable for abuse has only served to make non-medical users migrate over to more dangerous heroin, which is increasingly laced with illicit fentanyl. 

This is how things always work with prohibition. Fighting a war on drugs is like playing a game of "Whac-a-mole." The war is never-ending and the deaths keep mounting.

The so-called "opioid crisis" has morphed into a "fentanyl and heroin crisis." But it has been an unintended consequence of prohibition from the get go.

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Webpage: https://www.valleysurgicalclinics.com/

Jeffrey A. Singer, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Board Certified General Surgeon

Founder of Valley Surgical Clinics. Dr. Singer received his M.D. from New York Medial College in New York City, where he was elected into Alpha Omega Alpha (Iona Chapter), the Honor Medical Society. He completed his Surgical Residency at Maricopa County General Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona. He is Board Certified in the specialty of General Surgery. He has over 20 years of experience in his field of general and laparoscopic surgery. Dr. Singer is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the International College of Surgeons, the Southwestern Surgical Congress, & the American Society of Abdominal Surgeons.

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