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Michelle Alexander on Palestinian Suffering

Written by Subject: Israel - Palestine

Michelle Alexander on Palestinian Suffering

by Stephen Lendman (stephenlendman.org - Home - Stephen Lendman)

Since UK Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour's 1917 call for establishing a nation for Jews in historic Palestine, their people have endured over a century of discriminatory injustice. 

Israel's 1948 war of aggression stole 78% of their homeland, the rest in June 1967, including Jerusalem, a UN-designated international city.

Endless conflict, occupation, dispossession, and repression, along with social and cultural fragmentation define conditions for beleaguered Palestinians – over 100 years of suffering, no end of it in sight, the world community dismissive of their fundamental rights.

Virtually everything important affecting their lives and well-being are decided by others, an intolerable situation with no prospect for change - US/Israeli installed quisling PA government, serving as the Jewish state's enforcer.

Law professor, scholar, author, civil rights champion Michelle Alexander is perhaps best known for her book titled "The New Jim Crow: Incarceration in an Age of Colorblindness," her most noted work.

She explained that "(m)ore black men are in prison or jail, on probation or parole than were enslaved in 1850 before the Civil War began."

Racist drug laws largely affect "poor communities of color." In America's inner-cities, most Black youths can expect criminal injustice prosecutions one or more times in their lifetimes.

Over 60% of Black men born in 1965 or later without high school degrees (following passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act banning discrimination) have prison records.

They're marked for life, targeted by militarized cops for the color of their skin, leaving them vulnerable to re-arrest, imprisonment or death. America's racist war on drugs disproportionately targets people of color and ethnic minorities.

Racism defined the US from inception. Racist war wages against Americans and unwanted aliens of the wrong color, ethnicity or religion - its global gulag the shame of the nation.

In her NYT op-ed, a rare example of truth-telling on a vital issue, permitted by the self-styled newspaper of record, one-sidedly supporting Israel, ignoring its high crimes in its own reporting, Alexander highlighted Martin Luther King's notable April 4, 1967 "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" address.

It was delivered one year to the day before his state-sponsored assassination, his truth-telling remarks criticized at the time, ignored ever since by major media.

Over half a century ago, King called America "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today…on the wrong side of a world revolution," adding: "We still have a choice today: nonviolent coexistence, or violent co-annihilation."

"We must move past indecision to action. If we do not act, we shall surely be dragged down the long, dark and shameful corridors of time reserved for those who possess power without compassion, might without morality, and strength without sight."

Silence is "betrayal…(N)o one who has any concern for the integrity and life (in) America today can ignore the present war. If America's soul becomes totally poisoned, part of the autopsy must read Vietnam."

"This madness must cease…We must stop now…We must continue to raise our voices if our nation persists in its perverse ways in Vietnam."

Accusing America of being run by "criminals," imagine what he'd say if alive today, US wars of aggression raging in multiple theaters, no end of them in prospect, the threat of possible catastrophic nuclear war.

Alexander explained that King was urged to stay silent about the war or risk being called a communist sympathizer, harming the civil rights movement.

He couldn't stay silent about the cutting-edge issue of the time "because (his) conscience le(ft) (him) no other choice," he said, adding "(a) time comes when silence is betrayal. (T)hat time has come for us in relation to Vietnam."

Taking a moral, ethical, and legal stand for peace and justice cost him his life. If alive today, he'd be age-90.

Alexander wrote her op-ed because she can no longer remain silent about "one of the great moral challenges of our time: the crisis in Israel-Palestine," explaining:

With rare exceptions, "the entire Congress (most often is) "silent on the human rights nightmare" in Occupied Palestine, Gazans harmed most of all, an issue obsessing me personally, one I address repeatedly, feeling obligated as a Jew to speak out, refusing ever to be silent on this and every other vital issue.

Horrific conditions in the Territories are "reminiscent of apartheid in South Africa and Jim Crow segregation in the United States," said Alexander, much worse she should have stressed, but to her credit she's speaking out, taking a stand for long-denied justice, others with her, the only way to push things for hopeful change.

King was right. Silence is betrayal. If alive today, he'd surely champion the Palestinian cause, supporting their human and civil rights the way he did for Black Americans.

Alexander stressed the importance of "speak(ing) out passionately against the human rights crisis in Israel-Palestine, despite the risks…"

"We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak," said King. Edmund Burke stressed that "(t)he only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is (for) good men (to) do nothing."

It's never an option for activists, Alexander saying "to honor King's message and not merely the man, we must condemn Israel's actions: unrelenting violations of international law, continued occupation of the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and Gaza, home demolitions and land confiscations," adding: 

"We must cry out at the treatment of Palestinians at checkpoints, the routine searches of their homes and restrictions on their movements, and the severely limited access to decent housing, schools, food, hospitals and water that many of them face."

"We must not tolerate Israel's refusal even to discuss the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes, as prescribed by United Nations resolutions, and we ought to question the US government funds that have supported multiple hostilities and thousands of civilian casualties in Gaza, as well as the $38 billion the US government has pledged in military support to Israel."

All of the above issues are essential to speak out about and much more, including civil rule for Jews, militarized apartheid discrimination against Palestinians.

Daily life in Occupied Palestine is intolerable, collective punishment longstanding official policy. So is state terror and institutionalized racism.

Normal daily life is denied. Peaceful demonstrations called "riots" are prohibited, viciously attacked when held. Borders are closed, population centers isolated, economic strangulation imposed, slow-motion genocide inflicted on blockaded Gazans.

Multiple daily neighborhood incursions, land, air, and sea attacks, bulldozed homes, ethnic cleansing, targeted killings, mass arrests, torture, and gulag imprisonment reflect daily life for praying to the wrong God.

Israel gets away with high crimes of war and against humanity because of support and encouragement by Washington, along with world community indifference toward Palestinian rights.

They're brutalized as viciously as Nazis mistreated Jews, enduring virtually every imaginable form of indignity, degradation, and criminal actions against them - including live fire against peaceful demonstrators threatening no one, never anything this extreme against Jews doing the same thing.

Israel is a flagrant international law violator. Law Professor Francis Boyle explained that since the first intifada erupted in 1987, "the world has seen heinous war crimes inflicted every day by Israel against the Palestinian people," including daily flagrant breaches of Fourth Geneva, the Rome Statute, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, countless Security Council resolutions, and other international laws.

Israel is guilty of "murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, and other inhumane acts against any civilian population, before or during the war, or persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds in execution of or in connection with any crime within the jurisdiction of the Tribunal, whether or not in violation of the domestic law of the country where perpetrated," Boyle explained, adding:

Crimes against humanity, a US and Israeli specialty "are the historical and legal precursor to the international crime of genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention."

Wanting to live free in sovereign Palestine is called terrorism by Israel, free and open expression considered incitement, resisting tyranny, a universal right, called terrorism.

Alexander and other supporters of Palestinian rights agree that justifiable criticism of Zionism and Israel isn't anti-Semitism. The Big Lie otherwise won't die.

She pledged in the new year "to speak with greater courage and conviction about injustices beyond our borders, particularly those that are funded by our government, and stand in solidarity with struggles for democracy and freedom." 

Her "conscience leaves (her) no other choice." The same spirit should drive every human and civil right supporter of governance of, by, and for everyone equitably at home and abroad.

Alexander's article is long, detailed, and important to read. Her passion and mine support right over wrong - for Palestinians and all other persecuted people everywhere.

VISIT MY NEW WEB SITE: stephenlendman.org (Home - Stephen Lendman). Contact at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

My newest book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: How the US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html

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