Chris Hellman - budget analyst for the the National Priorities Project 
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Subject:  WAR: About that War

Chris Hellman - budget analyst for the the National Priorities Project

Chris Hellman - budget analyst for the the National Priorities Project - Cost of War: Breaking It Down

Program Date:  Wednesday, January 19, 2011
Hour 1:
Media Type: Audio   •  Time: 41:19 Mins and Secs
File Size: 39.67 Mb   File Type: .mp3
Hour 2:
Media Type: Audio   •  Time: 41:18 Mins and Secs
File Size: 39.65 Mb   File Type: .mp3

Chris Hellman - budget analyst for the the National Priorities Project

Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock - Radio

Host: Ernest Hancock

Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock strives to create an understanding of the Philosophy of Liberty. Understanding is far more important than agreement -- that will come in its own time.

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Media Type: Audio   •  Time: 41:19 Mins and Secs
File Size: 39.67 Mb   File Type: .mp3
Guests Chris Hellman
Topics Cost of War: Breaking It Down

FreedomsPhoenix Newsletter - Morning Dispatch - Afternoon Dispatch
Chris Hellman - budget analyst for the the National Priorities Project

National Priorities Project (NPP) makes complex federal budget information transparent and accessible so people can prioritize and influence how their tax dollars are spent.

Cost of War
Cost of War in Afghanistan since 2001
To date, $445.1 billion dollars has been allocated for the war in Afghanistan since 2001.

Monday (January 17) is the 50th anniversary of President Dwight
Eisenhower's farewell address, in which he warned of the rise of a
"military-industrial complex."

Eisenhower warns us of the military industrial complex.

Martin Luther King Day is also Monday. He said: "A nation that continues
year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of
social uplift is approaching spiritual death."

Media Type: Audio   •  Time: 41:18 Mins and Secs
File Size: 39.65 Mb   File Type: .mp3

The farewell speech of U.S.A. President, Dwight Eisenhower. Given on 17 January 1961 and televised in the U.S.A. (Link to audio recording.)

Good evening, my fellow Americans.

First, I should like to express my gratitude to the radio and television networks for the opportunities they have given me over the years to bring reports and messages to our nation. My special thanks go to them for the opportunity of addressing you this evening.

Three days from now, after a half century in the service of our country, I shall lay down the responsibilities of office as, in traditional and solemn ceremony, the authority of the Presidency is vested in my successor.

This evening I come to you with a message of leave-taking and farewell, and to share a few final thoughts with you, my countrymen. Like every other citizen, I wish the new President, and all who will labor with him, Godspeed. I pray that the coming years will be blessed with peace and prosperity for all.

Our people expect their President and the Congress to find essential agreement on issues of great moment, the wise resolution of which will better shape the future of the nation. My own relations with the Congress, which began on a remote and tenuous basis when, long ago, a member of the Senate appointed me to West Point, have since ranged to the intimate during the war and immediate post-war period, and finally to the mutually interdependent during these past eight years. In this final relationship, the Congress and the Administration have, on most vital issues, cooperated well, to serve the nation good, rather than mere partisanship, and so have assured that the business of the nation should go forward. So, my official relationship with Congress ends in a feeling -- on my part -- of gratitude that we have been able to do so much together.

We now stand ten years past the midpoint of a century that has witnessed four major wars among great nations. Three of these involved our own country. Despite these holocausts, America is today the strongest, the most influential, and most productive nation in the world. Understandably proud of this pre-eminence, we yet realize that America's leadership and prestige depend, not merely upon our unmatched material progress, riches and military strength, but on how we use our power in the interests of world peace and human betterment.

Throughout America's adventure in free government, our basic purposes have been to keep the peace, to foster progress in human achievement, and to enhance liberty, dignity and integrity among peoples and among nations. To strive for less would be unworthy of a free and religious people. Any failure traceable to arrogance or our lack of comprehension or readiness to sacrifice would inflict upon us grievous hurt, both at home and abroad.

Progress toward these noble goals is persistently threatened by the conflict now engulfing the world. It commands our whole attention, absorbs our very beings. We face a hostile ideology global in scope, atheistic in character, ruthless in purpose, and insidious in method. Unhappily, the danger it poses promises to be of indefinite duration. To meet it successfully, there is called for, not so much the emotional and transitory sacrifices of crisis, but rather those which enable us to carry forward steadily, surely, and without complaint the burdens of a prolonged and complex struggle with liberty the stake. Only thus shall we remain, despite every provocation, on our charted course toward permanent peace and human betterment.

Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties. A huge increase in newer elements of our defenses; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research -- these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel.

But each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration: the need to maintain balance in and among national programs, balance between the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desirable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. Good judgment seeks balance and progress. Lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration. The record of many decades stands as proof that our people and their Government have, i

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