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Occupy Wall Street, Re-energized: A Leaderless Movement Plots a Comeback

• time.com

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

 

In a society in which we're used to taking direction from Presidents and CEOs, captains and quarterbacks, Occupy Wall Street's leaderless structure seems like a formula for chaos. And yet nearly a month after protesters were evicted from the movement's birthplace in Zuccotti Park in downtown Manhattan the exercise in organized anarchy is still going strong. On Tuesday, Occupy Wall Streeters in 20 cities across the country marched in neighborhoods that have been hardest hit by foreclosures. In East New York, Brooklyn, about 400 protesters broke into a foreclosed vacant property and moved in a family that was homeless after losing their house to a bank.

Since the Nov. 15 eviction, much of New York Occupy Wall Street group's day-to-day activities have moved inside. Occupy Wall Streeters have moved in to a donated small office space in downtown Manhattan, with desks for about 50 workers. Crowds have dwindled, particularly at Zuccotti Park, where protesters are allowed to gather, but no longer sleep. Organizers say a smaller but more dedicated group is now doing much of the work of planning marches and deciding Occupy Wall Street's next moves. (See pictures of the Occupy Wall Street movement.)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

The Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) has mapped the deepest part of the ocean in greater detail than ever before.

The scientists mapped the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific, which runs about 1,550 miles and extends down to nearly seven miles.

The deepest point measured extends deeper below sea level than the height of Mount Everest, which is the highest point on the Earth.

“We mapped the entire trench, from its northern end at Dutton Ridge, all the way to where it becomes the Yap Trench in the south,” explained Dr Jim Gardner from CCOM, which is based at the University of New Hampshire.

“We used a multibeam echosounder mounted on a US Navy hydrographic ship. This instrument allows you to map a swath of soundings perpendicular to the line of travel of the ship. It’s like mowing the grass. And we were able to map the trench at a 100m resolution,” he told BBC News.

The scientists presented the results of the mapping at the 2011 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.

Source: redOrbit (http://s.tt/14Ibe)

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