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News Link • Israel

Friends of Israel

•, By Connie Bruck
On July 23rd, officials of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee?the powerful lobbying group known as AIPAC?gathered in a conference room at the Capitol for a closed meeting with a dozen Democratic senators. The agenda of the meeting, which was attended by other Jewish leaders as well, was the war in the Gaza Strip. In the century-long conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians, the previous two weeks had been particularly harrowing. In Israeli towns and cities, families heard sirens warning of incoming rockets and raced to shelters. In Gaza, there were scenes of utter devastation, with hundreds of Palestinian children dead from bombing and mortar fire. The Israeli government claimed that it had taken extraordinary measures to minimize civilian casualties, but the United Nations was launching an inquiry into possible war crimes. Even before the fighting escalated, the United States, Israel's closest ally, had made little secret of its frustration with the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. "How will it have peace if it is unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupation, and allow for Palestinian sovereignty, security, and dignity?" Philip Gordon, the White House co?rdinator for the Middle East, said in early July. "It cannot maintain military control of another people indefinitely. Doing so is not only wrong but a recipe for resentment and recurring instability." Although the Administration repeatedly reaffirmed its support for Israel, it was clearly uncomfortable with the scale of Israel's aggression. AIPAC did not share this unease; it endorsed a Senate resolution in support of Israel's "right to defend its citizens," which had seventy-nine co-sponsors and passed without a word of dissent.

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