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News Link • Education: Government Schools

The Next Generation Of "America's Thought Police" Is Being Birthed On Our College Camp

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If you want to understand the zeal with which social media platforms are now being censored, all you have to do is to look at what has been happening on our college campuses. 

There is a national movement to combat "offensive speech", and this movement has been working very hard  "to scrub campuses clean of words, ideas, and subjects that might cause discomfort or give offense".  And these days, just about anything that you might say or think is probably going to deeply offend someone.  For example, saying that "America is the land of opportunity" is now considered to be a "microaggression", and even the act of hanging an American flag in front of your dwelling can also be considered to be a "microaggression" depending on the context.  It can be tempting to laugh at how ridiculous our college students have become, but it is imperative to remember that these students all eventually enter the real world, and many of them end up in positions of power.  And from those positions of power, they can make life extremely uncomfortable for all the rest of us.  The "social media purge" is a perfect example of this, and the censorship of speech is only going to become more widespread as time goes on.  The next generation of "America's thought police" is rising, and they intend to make sure that the future belongs to the politically correct.

Things have already reached such absurd levels that even those that are attempting to "raise awareness of microaggressions" are being accused of "microaggressions" themselves.  Just check out the following example

Some recent campus actions border on the surreal. In April, at Brandeis University, the Asian American student association sought to raise awareness of microaggressions against Asians through an installation on the steps of an academic hall. The installation gave examples of microaggressions such as "Aren't you supposed to be good at math?" and "I'm colorblind! I don't see race." But a backlash arose among other Asian American students, who felt that the display itself was a microaggression. The association removed the installation, and its president wrote an e-mail to the entire student body apologizing to anyone who was "triggered or hurt by the content of the microaggressions."

We are rapidly getting to the point in this country where a large portion of the population will be deathly afraid of saying or doing anything the least bit controversial for fear that someone might be "offended".

And even if you are exceedingly careful, you still might end up offending someone and find yourself mired in an endless investigation.  For instance, consider what happened at one community college in New Jersey

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