Article Image

IPFS News Link • Techno Gadgets

Remote Amazon Tribe Gets Internet Access . . . You ALREADY KNOW What Happens Next!

• https://corbettreport.substack.comby James Corbett

Well, wonder no more! That's exactly what you're about to find out.

Yes. as either an elaborate PR stunt or a selfless act of generosity (depending on whom you ask), a wealthy American benefactor has just bestowed the "gift" of Starlink antennae on an Amazonian tribe to connect their isolated community to the internet.

In other words, we are watching exactly what transpires when you introduce a non-technological tribe to the glories of the internet. And the result of this strange little experiment has been exactly as horrific as you might imagine. . . .

The Vale do Javari is one of the largest indigenous territories in Brazil. Located in a remote region of Brazil's Amazonas state, it is believed to be home to "the greatest concentration of isolated groups in the Amazon and the world."

One of those groups is the Marubo, a tribe of around 2,000 people who have had only limited contact with the outside world since they were first "discovered" during the Amazon rubber boom of the early 20th century.

The Marubo have been in touch with the outside world for a century now, but for the most part they have eschewed modern technology and amenities in favour of their traditional tribal lifestyle. They live in communal huts and they fish, hunt wild boar, grow cassava and eat banana porridge.

But nine months ago, everything changed for the Marubo.. That's when Enoque Marubo—a leader of the tribe who spent years living in the "civilized" world and thus realized the potential value of the internet—recorded a 50-second video asking for help connecting his community to the world wide web. Days later, they heard back from Allyson Reneau.

Reneau is—according to her website—an international motivational speaker, a professional gymnastics coach, a successful entrepreneur and, oh by the way, the mother of 11 children. She also likes to highlight her international charity work, which includes visiting children in Rwanda, talking on Pakistani television and speaking at conferences in South Africa.

JonesPlantation