Article Image

Bradley Manning: Victimized by Police State Injustice

Written by Subject: Police State
Bradley Manning: Victimized by Police State Injustice

by Stephen Lendman

Manning's conviction is chilling. It reflects police state viciousness. Imagine being criminalized for doing the right thing. Imagine being called a traitor for acting responsibly.

Manning's no spy. He's no criminal. He deserves praise, not prosecution. America honors its worst. It persecutes its best. It's unsafe to live in.

We're all vulnerable like Manning. Constitutional rights don't matter. They're quaint and out-of-date. America's a police state. Diktat power rules. Congress and federal courts are complicit. Media scoundrels march in lockstep.

No one's safe anywhere. Manning was pronounced guilty by accusation. He never had a chance. He faces longterm hard time. He'll languish in America's gulag.

Thousands of political prisoners fill it. It's the shame of the nation. It's the world's largest. It mocks judicial fairness. Police states operate that way. America's by far the worst.

State terror is official policy. War on humanity rages. Manning's one of many victims. He'll likely never be free again.

Candidate Obama promised transparency, accountability, and reform. As president, he usurped diktat powers. He governs lawlessly. He prioritizes police state terror. He targets whistleblowers. He wants truth silenced.

Manning committed no crimes. He acted responsibly. He did so heroically. According to Law Professor Marjorie Cohn, he "fulfilled his legal duty to report war crimes."

"Enshrined in the US Army Subject Schedule No. 27-1 is 'the obligation to report all violations of the law of war,' " she said.

Crimes of war, against humanity and genocide demand disclosure. Manning was legally obligated to reveal them. He did the right thing. He faces longterm hard time for doing so.

Prosecuting him mocks rule of law justice. It's the American way. It sends a chilling message. Exposing US war crimes and other wrongdoing assures cruel and unusual punishment.

Manning was convicted on 20 of 22 charges. They include six espionage counts under the 1917 Espionage Act. It's a WW I relic. It has no current relevance. It belongs in history's dustbin.

It prohibited interfering with military operations during war time, supporting the enemy, promoting insubordination in the ranks, and impeding recruitment. It's unrelated to whistleblowing.

Manning's one of eight Obama victims wrongfully charged under Espionage Act provisions.

Earlier ones included Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) founder Bill Haywood, social justice advocate Emma Goldman, journalist/author/socialist activist John Reed, political activist Max Eastman, civil rights leader Philip Randolph, and Social Democratic Party of America and its successor Socialist Party of America co-founder Victor Berger.

On July 30, the Bradley Manning Support Network (BMSG) headlined "Bradley Manning acquitted of 'Aiding the Enemy' charge, month-long sentencing phase now determines fate."

David Coombs represents Manning. "We won the battle, now we need to go win the war," he said. "Today is a good day, but Bradley is by no means out of the fire."

Five of the most serious charges are "ripe for appeal." Judge Col. Denise Lind altered them a week ago. She did so lawlessly. According to Coombs:

Prosecutors and Lind way overstepped. "The Government has pushed this case beyond the bounds of legal propriety."

Amnesty International called America's priorities "upside down."

"The US government has refused to investigate credible allegations of torture and other crimes under international law despite overwhelming evidence."

"Yet they decided to prosecute Manning who it seems was trying to do the right thing - reveal credible evidence of unlawful behavior by the government."

"You investigate and prosecute those who destroy the credibility of the government by engaging in acts such as torture which are prohibited under the US Constitution and in international law."

"The US government has refused to investigate credible allegations of torture and other crimes under international law despite overwhelming evidence."

"Yet they decided to prosecute Manning who it seems was trying to do the right thing - reveal credible evidence of unlawful behavior by the government."

"You investigate and prosecute those who destroy the credibility of the government by engaging in acts such as torture which are prohibited under the US Constitution and in international law."

BMSG's campaigning to pardon Manning. Last week, a full page New York Times ad said:

"Bradley Manning believed you, Mr. President, when you came into office promising the most transparent administration in history, and that you would protect whistle-blowers."  

Now would be a good time to start upholding that pledged transparency, beginning with PFC Manning."

His family released a statement saying:

"We want to express our deep thanks to David Coombs, who has dedicated three years of his life to serving as lead counsel in Brad's case."

"We also want to thank Brad's Army defense team, Major Thomas Hurley and Captain Joshua Tooman, for their tireless efforts on Brad's behalf, and Brad's first defense counsel, Captain Paul Bouchard, who was so helpful to all of us in those early confusing days and first suggested David Coombs as Brad's counsel."

"Most of all, we would like to thank the thousands of people who rallied to Brad's cause, providing financial and emotional support throughout this long and difficult time, especially Jeff Paterson and Courage to Resist and the Bradley Manning Support Network."

"Their support has allowed a young army private to defend himself against the full might of not only the US army but also the US government."

ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project director Ben Wizner said:

"While we're relieved that Mr. Manning was acquitted of the most dangerous charge, the ACLU has long held the view that leaks to the press in the public interest should not be prosecuted under the Espionage Act."

"Since Manning already pleaded guilty to charges of leaking information - which carry significant punishment - it seems clear that the government was seeking to intimidate anyone who might consider revealing valuable information in the future."

On July 30, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) condemned Manning's conviction, saying:

"While the 'aiding the enemy' charges (on which Manning was rightly acquitted) received the most attention from the mainstream media, the Espionage Act itself is a discredited relic of the WWI era, created as a tool to suppress political dissent and antiwar activism, and it is outrageous that the government chose to invoke it in the first place against Manning."

"Government employees who blow the whistle on war crimes, other government incompetence should be protected under the First Amendment."

"We now live in a country where someone who exposes war crimes can be sentenced to life even if not found guilty of aiding the enemy, while those responsible for the war crimes remain free."

"If the government equates being a whistleblower with espionage or aiding the enemy, what is the future of journalism in this country? What is the future of the First Amendment?"

"Manning's treatment, prosecution, and sentencing have one purpose: to silence potential whistleblowers and the media as well. One of the main targets has been our clients, WikiLeaks and Julian Assange, for publishing the leaks."

"Given the US government's treatment of Manning, Assange should be granted asylum in his home country of Australia and given the protections all journalists and publishers deserve."

"We stand in solidarity with Bradley Manning and call for the government to take heed and end its assault on the First Amendment."

The Electronic Freedom Foundation called Manning's conviction "deeply troubling." It's "particularly relevant to - and especially frightening for - folks who love the Internet and use digital tools."

A disturbing trend continues. Disproportionate/unfair punishments follow. Exposing government wrongdoing exposes anyone to injustice.

Manning faces longterm hard time. "(N)o member of the press or public interested in more transparency about how our military works (or doesn't work) should rest easy with this verdict."

Julian Assange said "(t)he Obama administration has been chipping away (at) democratic freedoms in the United States. With today's verdict, Obama has hacked off much more."

"The administration is intent on deterring and silencing whistleblowers, intent on weakening freedom of the press."

"Bradley Manning's alleged disclosures have exposed war crimes, sparked revolutions, and induced democratic reform. He is the quintessential whistleblower."

We're all Bradley Manning. His conviction leaves everyone vulnerable. Obama criminalized speaking truth to power. Anyone can be targeted for doing so. Police states operate that way. America's by far the worst.

Transcripts of Manning's trial can be found on the Freedom of the Press web site. They include Judge Lind's July 30 ruling.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

His new book is titled "Banker Occupation: Waging Financial War on Humanity."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com.

Listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network.

It airs Fridays at 10AM US Central time and Saturdays and Sundays at noon. All programs are archived for easy listening.

http://www.progressiveradionetwork.com/the-progressive-news-hour Bradley Manning: Victimized by Police State Justice

by Stephen Lendman

Manning's conviction is chilling. It reflects police state viciousness. Imagine being criminalized for doing the right thing. Imagine being called a traitor for acting responsibly.

Manning's no spy. He's no criminal. He deserves praise, not prosecution. America honors its worst. It persecutes its best. It's unsafe to live in.

We're all vulnerable like Manning. Constitutional rights don't matter. They're quaint and out-of-date. America's a police state. Diktat power rules. Congress and federal courts are complicit. Media scoundrels march in lockstep.

No one's safe anywhere. Manning was pronounced guilty by accusation. He never had a chance. He faces longterm hard time. He'll languish in America's gulag.

Thousands of political prisoners fill it. It's the shame of the nation. It's the world's largest. It mocks judicial fairness. Police states operate that way. America's by far the worst.

State terror is official policy. War on humanity rages. Manning's one of many victims. He'll likely never be free again.

Candidate Obama promised transparency, accountability, and reform. As president, he usurped diktat powers. He governs lawlessly. He prioritizes police state terror. He targets whistleblowers. He wants truth silenced.

Manning committed no crimes. He acted responsibly. He did so heroically. According to Law Professor Marjorie Cohn, he "fulfilled his legal duty to report war crimes."

"Enshrined in the US Army Subject Schedule No. 27-1 is 'the obligation to report all violations of the law of war,' " she said.

Crimes of war, against humanity and genocide demand disclosure. Manning was legally obligated to reveal them. He did the right thing. He faces longterm hard time for doing so.

Prosecuting him mocks rule of law justice. It's the American way. It sends a chilling message. Exposing US war crimes and other wrongdoing assures cruel and unusual punishment.

Manning was convicted on 20 of 22 charges. They include six espionage counts under the 1917 Espionage Act. It's a WW I relic. It has no current relevance. It belongs in history's dustbin.

It prohibited interfering with military operations during war time, supporting the enemy, promoting insubordination in the ranks, and impeding recruitment. It's unrelated to whistleblowing.

Manning's one of eight Obama victims wrongfully charged under Espionage Act provisions.

Earlier ones included Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) founder Bill Haywood, social justice advocate Emma Goldman, journalist/author/socialist activist John Reed, political activist Max Eastman, civil rights leader Philip Randolph, and Social Democratic Party of America and its successor Socialist Party of America co-founder Victor Berger.

On July 30, the Bradley Manning Support Network (BMSG) headlined "Bradley Manning acquitted of 'Aiding the Enemy' charge, month-long sentencing phase now determines fate."

David Coombs represents Manning. "We won the battle, now we need to go win the war," he said. "Today is a good day, but Bradley is by no means out of the fire."

Five of the most serious charges are "ripe for appeal." Judge Col. Denise Lind altered them a week ago. She did so lawlessly. According to Coombs:

Prosecutors and Lind way overstepped. "The Government has pushed this case beyond the bounds of legal propriety."

Amnesty International called America's priorities "upside down."

"The US government has refused to investigate credible allegations of torture and other crimes under international law despite overwhelming evidence."

"Yet they decided to prosecute Manning who it seems was trying to do the right thing - reveal credible evidence of unlawful behavior by the government."

"You investigate and prosecute those who destroy the credibility of the government by engaging in acts such as torture which are prohibited under the US Constitution and in international law."

"The US government has refused to investigate credible allegations of torture and other crimes under international law despite overwhelming evidence."

"Yet they decided to prosecute Manning who it seems was trying to do the right thing - reveal credible evidence of unlawful behavior by the government."

"You investigate and prosecute those who destroy the credibility of the government by engaging in acts such as torture which are prohibited under the US Constitution and in international law."

BMSG's campaigning to pardon Manning. Last week, a full page New York Times ad said:

"Bradley Manning believed you, Mr. President, when you came into office promising the most transparent administration in history, and that you would protect whistle-blowers."  

Now would be a good time to start upholding that pledged transparency, beginning with PFC Manning."

His family released a statement saying:

"We want to express our deep thanks to David Coombs, who has dedicated three years of his life to serving as lead counsel in Brad's case."

"We also want to thank Brad's Army defense team, Major Thomas Hurley and Captain Joshua Tooman, for their tireless efforts on Brad's behalf, and Brad's first defense counsel, Captain Paul Bouchard, who was so helpful to all of us in those early confusing days and first suggested David Coombs as Brad's counsel."

"Most of all, we would like to thank the thousands of people who rallied to Brad's cause, providing financial and emotional support throughout this long and difficult time, especially Jeff Paterson and Courage to Resist and the Bradley Manning Support Network."

"Their support has allowed a young army private to defend himself against the full might of not only the US army but also the US government."

ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project director Ben Wizner said:

"While we're relieved that Mr. Manning was acquitted of the most dangerous charge, the ACLU has long held the view that leaks to the press in the public interest should not be prosecuted under the Espionage Act."

"Since Manning already pleaded guilty to charges of leaking information - which carry significant punishment - it seems clear that the government was seeking to intimidate anyone who might consider revealing valuable information in the future."

On July 30, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) condemned Manning's conviction, saying:

"While the 'aiding the enemy' charges (on which Manning was rightly acquitted) received the most attention from the mainstream media, the Espionage Act itself is a discredited relic of the WWI era, created as a tool to suppress political dissent and antiwar activism, and it is outrageous that the government chose to invoke it in the first place against Manning."

"Government employees who blow the whistle on war crimes, other government incompetence should be protected under the First Amendment."

"We now live in a country where someone who exposes war crimes can be sentenced to life even if not found guilty of aiding the enemy, while those responsible for the war crimes remain free."

"If the government equates being a whistleblower with espionage or aiding the enemy, what is the future of journalism in this country? What is the future of the First Amendment?"

"Manning's treatment, prosecution, and sentencing have one purpose: to silence potential whistleblowers and the media as well. One of the main targets has been our clients, WikiLeaks and Julian Assange, for publishing the leaks."

"Given the US government's treatment of Manning, Assange should be granted asylum in his home country of Australia and given the protections all journalists and publishers deserve."

"We stand in solidarity with Bradley Manning and call for the government to take heed and end its assault on the First Amendment."

The Electronic Freedom Foundation called Manning's conviction "deeply troubling." It's "particularly relevant to - and especially frightening for - folks who love the Internet and use digital tools."

A disturbing trend continues. Disproportionate/unfair punishments follow. Exposing government wrongdoing exposes anyone to injustice.

Manning faces longterm hard time. "(N)o member of the press or public interested in more transparency about how our military works (or doesn't work) should rest easy with this verdict."

Julian Assange said "(t)he Obama administration has been chipping away (at) democratic freedoms in the United States. With today's verdict, Obama has hacked off much more."

"The administration is intent on deterring and silencing whistleblowers, intent on weakening freedom of the press."

"Bradley Manning's alleged disclosures have exposed war crimes, sparked revolutions, and induced democratic reform. He is the quintessential whistleblower."

We're all Bradley Manning. His conviction leaves everyone vulnerable. Obama criminalized speaking truth to power. Anyone can be targeted for doing so. Police states operate that way. America's by far the worst.

Transcripts of Manning's trial can be found on the Freedom of the Press web site. They include Judge Lind's July 30 ruling.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

His new book is titled "Banker Occupation: Waging Financial War on Humanity."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com.

Listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network.

It airs Fridays at 10AM US Central time and Saturdays and Sundays at noon. All programs are archived for easy listening.

http://www.progressiveradionetwork.com/the-progressive-news-hour

http://www.dailycensored.com/31613/

Join us on our Social Networks:

 

Share this page with your friends on your favorite social network:

Free Talk Live