Letters to the Editor • Philosophy: Libertarianism

If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace

• Article
" Am I really making the best use of my time on Earth by advocating freedom for 300 million angry cowards?" No; you are advocating security for one angry coward. The idea of fighting for freedom should never be for oneself. Anyone engaged in such a struggle should be every bit as resigned to dying in the struggle as he is interested in surviving it, enjoying it; the greatest reward is not securing freedom for self, but for the future. Thomas Paine said, "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace." This is the conviction of a true father, patriot, and hero. It tells us to grow beyond ourselves and care for something outside our own skin.

4 Comments in Response to

Comment by Frank Magee
Entered on:

For a real understanding of the greatness behind Thomas Paine, see "The Real Thomas Paine" by Joseph M. Hentz. If you fight through all the revisionist history of the US, you will find that we probably had just one founding father, Thomas Paine. 

Comment by Ned The Head
Entered on:

Seems a pretty straight forward rejection of Randian selfishness. Of course the writer holds living in and fighting for peace to be roughly analogous which might be quaint or visionary depending on your outlook.

Comment by Skip Robinson
Entered on:

I believe I understand what you're attempting to say. Try a rewrite and give a more thorough argument of what you are attempting to relay to readers. It appears that you are responding to the quote shown above your essay.  Say that so there is no misunderstanding of your intentions. I ask this of you because it is an important issue. Also knowing the source of the comment would be good so that others could respond to it.   

Comment by Skip Robinson
Entered on:

Your comments are vague and therefore their validity and rational are in question.



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