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Radio/TV • Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock
Program Date:

07-19-16 -- Phranq Tamburri - Jeremy Kauffman - Jesse Walker -- (VIDEO & MP3s LOADED)

Phranq Tamburri (Trump Report) provides an update on the RNC Convention - Jeremy Kauffman (LBRY) on their decentralized digital library controlled by the community - Jesse Walker (books editor @ Reason Magazine) on his recent article titled 'Trumplan
Media Type: Audio • Time: 176 Minutes and 0 Secs
Guests: Phranq Tamburri
Topics: Trump Report
Media Type: Audio • Time: 59 Minutes and 17 Secs
Guests: Jeremy Kauffman
Topics: LBRY
Media Type: Audio • Time: 59 Minutes and 39 Secs
Guests: Jesse Walker

Hour 1 - 3

Media Type: Audio • Time: 176 Minutes and 0 Secs
Guests: Phranq Tamburri
Topics: Trump Report

Hour 1 - Phranq Tamburri (Trump Report) provides an update on the RNC Convention. TrumpReport@Yahoo.com to contact Phranq

Hour 2 - Jeremy Kauffman (LBRY) on their decentralized digital library controlled by the community

Hour 3 - Jesse Walker (books editor @ Reason Magazine) on his recent article titled 'Trumpland'

CALL IN TO SHOW: 602-264-2800

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July 19th, 2016

Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock

on LRN.FM / Monday - Friday

9 a.m. - Noon (EST)

Studio Line: 602-264-2800 

 

 

Hour 1

2016-07-19 Hour 1 Phranq Tamburri on RNC Convention.0 from Ernest Hancock on Vimeo.

Phranq Tamburri

BIO:

Dr. Phranq Tamburri is a naturopathic physician specializing in men's health with a sub-specialty in prostate cancer. In tandem to these fields, Dr. Tamburri treats male hormone deficiency, low energy, and sexual performance. Although naturopathic medicine is a specialty in itself, Dr. Tamburri has garnered recognition as an expert in the field of prostate cancer assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; each of the preceding from a balanced natural and allopathic perspective. His training in this area has been varied and wide in scope. As Chief Resident from his Alma Mater, he trained under Mayo trained urologist Bernard Gburek, M.D. at Scottsdale North Hospital while at the same time apprenticed under CMO and Physician of the Year Thomas Kruzel, N.D. who specialized in natural urology. Dr. Tamburri later was director of the Men's Health Clinic at his local teaching clinic. Currently he is long term professor of Clinical Urology at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and also sits as a member of the AZNMA and is the only naturopathic physician on the AZ State Funded SW Prostate Cancer Awareness Council. Dr. Tamburri has been published in this area along with multiple lectures to fellow physicians at yearly professional conventions. Recently he has been asked to serve as expert witness for the State of Arizona Board of Medical Examiners with regard to the management of natural prostate cancer assessment and treatment.

Webpage:

http://www.longevitymedical.com/physicians-staff/dr-phranq-tamburri-nmd/

Phranq's previous interviews on the Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock Radio Show:

https://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Guest-Page.htm?No=00672

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TOPIC: The Trump Report - Update on Donald Trump's Campaign

==========================

Phranq provides an update on the Republican National Convention...


Hour 2

Media Type: Audio • Time: 59 Minutes and 17 Secs
Guests: Jeremy Kauffman
Topics: LBRY

Hour 2 - Jeremy Kauffman (LBRY) on their decentralized digital library controlled by the community

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Hour 2

2016-07-19 Hour 2 Jeremy Kauffman from Ernest Hancock on Vimeo.

Jeremy Kauffman

LBRY - a content sharing and publishing platform that is decentralized and owned by it's users.

Webpage: https://lbry.io/

Click here to sign up: https://lbry.io/get?r=9a0f7

Jeremy is the CEO of LBRY, a digital marketplace that is decentralized and entirely controlled by it's users. Prior to LBRY, Jeremy built a software-as-a-service company that manages tens of millions of dollars for sport and activity organizations. He holds degrees in physics and computer science from RPI and has been a supporter of decentralized technology and freedom-of-information since high school.


Hour 3

Media Type: Audio • Time: 59 Minutes and 39 Secs
Guests: Jesse Walker

Hour 3 - Jesse Walker (books editor @ Reason Magazine) on his recent article titled 'Trumpland'

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Hour 3

2016-07-19 Hour 3 Jesse Walker from Ernest Hancock on Vimeo.

Jesse Walker

Jesse Walker is books editor of Reason magazine. He has written on topics ranging from pirate radio to copyright law to political paranoia, and he is author of the books Rebels on the Air: An Alternative History of Radio in America (New York University Press, 2001) and The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory (HarperCollins, 2013).

Walker's articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun, The Boston Globe, Time, The Week, CNN.com, Slate, Salon, L.A. Weekly, New York, The New Inquiry, The New Republic, The National Post, National Review, No Depression, Boing Boing, io9, Radio World, Telos, Z, the Journal of American Studies, and many other publications. He has also worked as a DJ, a dishwasher, and a miscellaneous office grunt, and was once hired to help move a clandestine dog farm.

Walker is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he received a degree in history. His personal blog is The Perpetual Three-Dot Column.

Walker lives in Baltimore with his wife and two daughters.

Books Editor @ Reason Magazine

Webpage: https://reason.com/

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Jesse comes on the show to talk about his recent article, 'Trumpland'...

Trumpland

Donald Trump's fans and foes face off when his travelling circus comes to town.

No two Trump rallies are alike, but the same tribes seem to form at every one. There are the supporters, a varied assortment of locals who want Donald Trump to be president. There are the protesters, a varied assortment of locals who want Donald Trump to get lost. There are the cops, who are supposed to keep the supporters and the protesters from killing each other. There are the vendors, self-employed peddlers who follow the candidate from town to town, hawking T-shirts, buttons, playing cards, hats, and other Trump-themed products. There are the gawkers, curiosity-seekers who blend in with the supporters but sometimes give themselves away by making wry jokes about the carnival bustling around them. And there is the press, stumbling about with pens and cameras, awkwardly asking strangers if they'd be willing to answer a few questions. That's me.

By the time I arrived at my first Trump rally, at the Times Union Center in Albany eight days before the New York primary, the events had acquired a reputation as incubators of mob violence. At an October speech in Miami, some Trump fans had attacked a group of protesters as the latter were ejected from the venue, kicking one in the knee and slamming another on the back with a Trump sign. At a November rally in Birmingham, a demonstrator had been punched, kicked, and choked. There were a flurry of assaults in March: the Louisville Trump supporters who shoved a woman; the guy who sucker-punched a protester as he was being led out of a rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina; the Tucson man who snatched a sign from a heckler and started hitting and kicking him with abandon. In Chicago, brawls broke out between pro- and anti-Trump factions as they waited for the candidate to appear. Trump wound up cancelling the rally, citing safety concerns and claiming that police had advised him to pull the plug. (The Chicago police deny that any such advice was issued.)

So when the pundits discuss Trump rallies, the talk tends to take on an apocalyptic tone. Writing in New York magazine, Andrew Sullivan described the disorder as the "embryonic form" of fascistic "organized street violence." The Hartford Courant ran an op-ed under the headline "Hostile Trump Rallies Echo Days Of Mob Rule." Rachel Maddow declared on MSNBC that Trump was "inarguably" ginning up violence on purpose, the plan being then to present himself as the strongman who can stop it. The Trump team, for its part, argues that it's the protesters who are the really violent ones, a line that goes at least as far as the candidate's comment on March 10 that some demonstrators were "bad dudes" who "get in there and start hitting people." No one has been able to corroborate that claim, though some protesters have been violent since then—besides the fighting in Chicago, there were the anti-Trump militants in Costa Mesa, California, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, who threw rocks and beer bottles outside rallies. And at press time, protesters at a Trump event in San Jose randomly punched and threw eggs at the candidate's supporters. So there are just enough cherry-pickable facts for two rival narratives to emerge, one where the Trump fans are a mindless mob being incited by a demagogue and one where they're merely defending themselves from a mob on the other side.

Yet most of the people who come to these rallies are peaceful, whether they love Trump or hate him; any portrait that reduces either side to a feral gang isn't accurate. Crowds are not big Borgs that sap people of their individuality, and the culture of these particular crowds is complicated, especially when you start comparing one rally to another.

In Albany, most of the supporters and protesters I encountered took a fairly good-natured view of the opposite tribe. Jeering at each other outside the arena, they seemed more like the fans of rival hockey teams than like Red Guard factions preparing to pummel each other in the street. When a fight did start to break out on the floor of the arena, with an angry man slapping a protester in the face, the rest of the crowd didn't join in; they pulled him away, like Red Wings fans yanking their drunken buddy back from the guy in the Bruins jersey who just dissed his dad.

At my second Trump rally, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, things never came even that close to a brawl. But my third, in South Central Pennsylvania, did start to get ugly. Different crowds have different dynamics, even if they contain the same tribes.

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