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Radio/TV • Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock
Program Date:

09-06-18 -- Gregg Tivnan - Richard Grove - Davi Barker (MP3's & VIDEO LOADED)

Gregg Tivnan (friend of Ernest and already living in a state of preparedness) in studio to talk about raising/feeding/breeding cows - Richard Grove (Tragedy And Hope) on censorship, First Amendment issues after 'they' first flagged then took down a Y

Hour One

Media Type: Audio • Time: 214 Minutes and 0 Secs
Guests: Gregg Tivnan

Hour 1 - Gregg Tivnan (friend of Ernest and already living in a state of preparedness) in studio to talk about raising/feeding/breeding cows

Hour 2&3 - Richard Grove (Tragedy And Hope) on censorship, First Amendment issues after 'they' first flagged then took down a YouTube video he posted with Ernest Hancock simply unboxing a Ghost Gunner. It violated YouTube's 'Community Guidelines' (whatever that means). Richard and Ernest explore the deeper issue that free speech is being stifled, and that has implications for the future...

CALL IN TO SHOW: 602-264-2800

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September 7th, 2018

Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock

on LRN.FM / Monday - Friday

9 a.m. - Noon (EST)

Studio Line: 602-264-2800 

 

Hour 1

APOLOGIES - NO VIDEO FOR HOUR 1 TODAY...

Gregg Tivnan

Gregg is a friend of Ernest, and already living in a state of preparedness. He is in studio to talk about raising/feeding/breeding cows, feeding and rotating the cows in various fields, the best/worst grass/feed, and what's best for the way their digestion works, etc...

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Hour Two

Media Type: Audio • Time: 173 Minutes and 0 Secs

Hour 2 - Richard Grove (Tragedy And Hope) on censorship, First Amendment issues after 'they' first flagged then took down a YouTube video he posted with Ernest Hancock simply unboxing a Ghost Gunner. It violated YouTube's 'Community Guidelines' (whatever that means). Richard and Ernest explore the deeper issue that free speech is being stifled, and that has implications for the future...

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Hour 2

Richard Grove

Tragedy & Hope

Webpage: https://tragedyandhope.com/

BIO: Richard Grove is an American conceptual artist and forensic historian who frames his groundbreaking research into epic multimedia productions to educate his audience.

Richard bases his art-of-information compositions upon the thousands of hours of research he's done into the history of Liberty and Freedom in the Western world.

In 2015 his work was viewed by individuals in 186 countries, proving that his findings are both relevant and meaningful to people around the world.

Richard's podcast, The Peace Revolution, is consistently ranked #1 in Higher-Education by PodOmatic, and provides listeners with a world-class education which no university on the planet can afford to provide. With many episodes ranging from 10-20 hours of content, Richard provides a broad and deep record of evidence which contradicts what we're taught in school, illustrating how to free ourselves from the illusions which bind our freedom.

Richard's work as a forensic historian focuses on the artifacts and evidence of the agenda known as the New World Order, originating with the Last Will and Testament of Cecil Rhodes to create a Secret Society whose sole aim was world domination by way of re-integrating America into the British Empire.

Richard recently wrote the Foreword for Sean Stone's book "New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism" (2016), based on Stone's 2006 Princeton American History thesis.

BACKGROUND:

In 2003, Richard Grove filed for federal whistleblower protection under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. He soon discovered that the court system, SEC, and corporate media worked together to block the public from hearing about whistleblower testimony; representing himself in court against a multi-billion-dollar international corporation, as detailed in the film 20/20 Hindsight: CENSORSHIP on the Frontline.

After representing himself in a multi-year court battle, he discovered that he was an honest player in a rigged game, at which point he invested his time and interests into digging into the underground history of America to discover how our freedoms were being undermined.

In 2006, he released on mp3 a 2-hour public disclosure "Project Constellation: A Message to the Future of America", which pointed out the myriad contradictions in public beliefs of American history and how individual liberty was being systematically deteriorated.

What may have sounded like conspiracy "theories" in 2006 (Data-Mining and Spying on Citizens, The Planning of Financial Catastrophes, NSA/Google, and Corporate  Media partaking in the demolition of our civil liberties), proves today  to be relevant and verifiable historical facts related by Richard during  his public disclosure via Project Constellation, and evident in his continued productions ever since.

Since then, Richard has created more than 500 hours of educational and informative media productions, in audio, video, and film formats, including a comprehensive conscious curriculum to teach individuals methods for learning anything and everything for themselves (a.k.a. "The Peace Revolution Podcast") to re-ignite self-reliance and restore individual liberty through self-education.

Some of his more powerful publications include:

The History Blueprint (2006-Present) an internet based interactive visual model in the form of a network diagram, connecting 10,000 points of knowledge related to the history of the New World Order agenda; showcasing 40,000 interconnections between the events, persons, and artifacts of evidence related to this topic.

The Deep End: Dive Into Consciousness (2015-Present) a subscribers-only episode-based video series of discussions juxtaposing history to current events, using evidence which goes far beyond what corporate media provides.

The Future of Freedom: A Feature Interview with NSA Whistleblower William Binney (2015)

Technocracy Rising: A Feature Interview with author Patrick Wood (2015)

State of Mind: The Psychology of Control (2013 documentary co-written by Richard Grove and co-produced with Free Mind Films; distributed by InfoWars, featuring G. Edward Griffin, Alex Jones, Lt. Col. Anthony Shaffer, Richard Grove)

History… So It Doesn't Repeat (2013-2015 video series)

"Black 9/11: Money, Motive and Technology" (2012 by Mark Gaffney), which features the testimony of Richard Grove, as introduced into evidence during his trial as a whistleblower.

The Ultimate History Lesson with John Taylor Gatto (2012) a 5-hour documentary exposing the foundations of American schooling

The Peace Revolution Podcast (2009-Present)

What You've Been Missing: Exposing the Noble Lie (2010)

20/20 Hindsight CENSORSHIP on the Frontline (2010)

9/11 Synchronicity Podcast (2006-2009) presenting contradictions of the official story of 9-11

Project Constellation (2006) detailing Richard's whistleblowing and research observations.

Richard's comprehensive film production list from 2006-Present can be found here. (www.TragedyandHope.com/TH-Films)

In 2013, ten years after blowing the whistle, Richard was nominated by author G. Edward Griffin to be listed in the Freedom Force International Hall of Honor.

 

Richard's previous interviews on the Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock Radio Show:

https://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Guest-Page.htm?No=00623

See Richard Grove's 'The Brain'

https://webbrain.com/brainpage/brain/D36749F1-3A40-09FA-957F-41294B88CB70#-154

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TOPIC:

Richard Grove talks about censorship and First Amendment issues after 'they' first flagged then took down a YouTube video he posted with Ernest Hancock simply unboxing a Ghost Gunner. It violated YouTube's 'Community Guidelines' (whatever that means). Richard and Ernest explore the deeper issue that free speech is being stifled, and that has implications for the future. Here is the notice Richard received from YouTube...

 

https://www.gstatic.com/youtube/img/branding/youtubelogo/2x/youtubelogo_60.png

 
 
 

Hi Tragedy and Hope,

As you may know, our Community Guidelines describe which content we allow – and don't allow – on YouTube. Your video Ernest Hancock gets his Ghost Gunner CNC Mill from Defense Distributed was flagged to us for review. Upon review, we've determined that it violates our guidelines and we've removed it from YouTube.

Video content restrictions

We have long prohibited content promoting the sale of firearms and in March, we announced updates to these policies. Our updated policies on content featuring firearms can be found in our Help Center. While we have removed your video, we have not issued a penalty against your account. We appreciate your taking the time to review your channel and remove any content that may be subject to enforcement of our policies going forward.

Impact on your account

Please note that this removal has not resulted in a Community Guidelines strike or penalty on your account.

We encourage you to review all videos in your account to make sure they are in line with our community guidelines as additional violations could result in strikes on your account, or even lead to account termination.

Sincerely,
- The YouTube Team

 
 
 
 

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Authoritarian Sociopathy

August 23rd, 2013   Submitted by Davi Barker

BlogImage200Many anarchists and libertarians eagerly study the psychology of tyrants in an effort to know their enemy in the battlefield of politics. Getting into the minds of our enemy is regarded as a strategy, a means to our political ends… which is an end to political means. However, I would suggest that the mind of our enemy is the battlefield itself, and politics is merely one of many strategies. We cannot fight the State with votes, or with cameras, or even with rifles, because factually the State only exists in the mind.

Our common definition for the State is a "monopoly on violence." This was originally coined by German political philosopher Max Weber, affirmed by Austrian economist Murray Rothbard in his book Anatomy of the State, and even echoed by authoritarian sociopath Barack Obama while campaigning in 2007. This definition is seldom disputed, even by the agents of the State. However, as surely as a pickpocket can knife you in the ribs, the State does not factually enjoy a monopoly on violence. The missing component is an often overlooked, but all important adjective: legitimate. The State is a monopoly on legitimate violence, and legitimacy is the only thing distinguishing a tax collector from a pickpocket, a police officer from a vigilante, or a soldier from a paid murderer. Legitimacy is an illusion in the mind without which the State does not even exist.

This illusion not only exists in the minds of the authoritarians, it exists in the minds of every subject who accepts their oppression. And every place that this illusion finds safe harbor is a trench in the field of battle. If we want to attack the State, we must attack the mind of the Statists. For that reason, the psychology of obedience and authority is not merely a tool in the activists utility belt, it is a topographical map of the battle field itself. So let's take a look.

Power and Obedience

We've all heard of the Milgram Experiment and the Stanford Prison Experiment. I've written about them before. So as not to waste your time, I'll summarize very briefly.

In the Milgram Experiment participants were divided into "teachers" and "learners" and placed in separate rooms. "Teachers" were instructed to read questions to the "learners" and if they answered incorrectly to administer an elecro-shock of ever increasing voltage. The "teachers" were unaware that electro-shocks were fake. After a few volts the "learner" began to object, to complain of a heart condition, and ultimately go silent. If the "teacher" asked to stop he was told by the experimenter," "the experiment requires that you continue." 65% administered the experiment's maximum massive 450-volt shock. The vast majority were willing to administer a lethal jolt of electricity to a complete stranger based upon nothing but the verbal prodding of an authority figure.

In the Stanford Prison Experiment participants were screened for mental health and randomly assigned as "prisoner" or "guard" to live in a two week long prison simulation. Guards were given uniforms, mirrored glasses, and wooden batons. Prisoners were dressed in smocks and addressed only by their prison numbers. Guards were instructed only to keep a fixed schedule, and that they could not physically harm prisoners. The experiment was halted after only six days because guards began to display cruel, even sadistic behavior including spraying prisoners with fire extinguishers, depriving them of bedding or restroom privileges, forcing them to go nude and locking them in "solitary confinement" in a dark closet. After an initial revolt, and a brief hunger strike, prisoners developed submissive attitudes, accepting physical abuse, and readily following orders inflict punishments on each other. They even engaged in horizontal discipline to keep each other in line. Both prisoners and guards fully internalized their fictional identities.

Ethical concerns raised by these experiments has made it almost impossible to study the authoritarian sociopathy in any meaningful way. Still, there have been some more recent studies that flesh out the findings of these classic experiments. Because of the new ethical guidelines the more recent experiments are not as dramatic, but the implications of their results are no less startling.

Power and Deception

Dana Carney is a professor at Columbia University. She conducted an experiment to discover if "leaders" and "subordinates" experience the same physiological stress while lying. She found that power not only makes lying easier, but pleasurable.

Participants filled out a personality test that identified them as "leaders" or "subordinates." In reality the selection was random, but the fake test created an air of legitimacy to their assignment. Leaders were placed in a large executive office and given an hour of busy work. Subordinates were placed in a small windowless cubical and given an hour of busy work. Then they engaged in a 10 minute mock negotiation over pay.

Afterwards half the participants were given $100 and told they could keep it if they lied and convinced the lead experimenter that they didn't have it. The experimenter did not know who had the money.

For most people lying elicits negative emotions, cognitive impairment, physiological stress, and nonverbal behavioral cues, which can all be measured. Video of the interviews was reviewed to identify behavioral cues. Saliva samples were tested for increases in the stress hormone cortisol. Tests of reaction time were conducted on the computer to demonstrate cognitive impairment. And a mood survey assessed participants' emotional states during the experiment.

By every measure "subordinates" exhibited all the indicators of deception, but liars in the "leader" class exhibited the exact opposite. By every measure "leaders" were indistinguishable from truth-tellers. In fact, they enjoyed reduced stress levels, increased cognitive function and reported positive emotions. Only "subordinates" reported feeling bad about lying.

Professor Carney concludes, "Power will lead to increases in intensity and frequency of lying."

Lying comes easier, and is inherently more pleasurable, to those in power, even fake authority. In other words, power rewards dishonesty with pleasure.

Power and Compassion

Psychologist Gerben A. Van Kleef from the University of Amsterdam conducted an experiment to identify how power influences emotional reactions to the suffering of others. Participants filled out a questionnaire about their own sense of power in their actual lives and were identified as "high-power" and "lower-power" individuals. Then they were randomly paired off to take turns sharing personal stories of great pain, or emotional suffering.

During the exchange the stress levels of both participants was measured by electrocardiogram (ECG) machines, and afterward they filled out a second questionnaire describing their own emotional experience, and what they perceived of their partner's emotional experienced.

You guessed it. Increased stress in the story teller correlated with increased stress in listener for low-power subjects, but not for high-power subjects. In other words, low-power individuals experienced the suffering of others, but high-power individuals experienced greater detachment. After the experiment high-power listeners self-reported being unmotivated to empathize with their partner. In other words, they saw the emotions of others, but they just didn't care. After the experiment, researchers inquired about whether participants would like to stay in touch with their partners. As you might expect, the low-power subjects liked the idea, but the high-power subjects didn't.

Power and Hypocrisy

It has become almost a cliche that the most outspoken anti-gay politicians are in fact closet homosexuals themselves, and the champions of "traditional family values" are engaged in extramarital affairs. Nothing is more common than the fiscal conservative who demands ridiculous luxuries at the taxpayer's expense, or the anti-war progressive who takes campaign donations from the military industrial complex. Well, now it seems there's some science behind the hypocrisy of those in power.

Joris Lammers, from Tilburg University, and Adam Galinsky of Kellogg School of Management conducted a battery of five experiments to test how power influences a person's moral standards, specifically whether they were likely to behave immorally while espousing intolerance for the behavior of others. In each of five experiments the results were about what you'd expect. Powerful people judge others more harshly but cheat more themselves. But in the last experiment they distinguished between legitimate power and illegitimate power and got the opposite results.

In the first experiment subjects were randomly assigned to as "high-power" or "low-power." To induce these feelings "high-power" subjects were asked to recall an experience where they felt powerful, and "low-power" subjects were asked to recall an experience where they felt powerless. They were asked to rate how immoral they considered cheating, and then they were given an opportunity to cheat at dice. The high-power subjects considered cheating a higher moral infraction than low-power subjects, but were also more likely to cheat themselves.

In the second experiment participants conducted a mock-government. Half were randomly assigned as "high-power" roles which gave orders to the half randomly given "low-power" roles. Then each group was asked about minor traffic violations, such as speeding, or rolling through stop signs. As expected, high-power subjects were more likely to to bend the rules themselves, but less likely to afford other drivers the same leniency.

In the third experiment participants were divided as in the first experiment, by recalling a personal experience. Each group was asked about their feelings about minor common tax evasions, such as not declaring freelance income. As expected, high-power subjects were more willing to bend the rules themselves, but less likely to afford others the same leniency.

In the fourth experiment participants were asked to complete a series of word puzzles. Half the participants were randomly given puzzles containing high-power words, and the other half were given puzzles containing low power words. Then all participants were asked what they'd do if they found an abandoned bike on the side of the road. As in all experiments, even with such an insignificant power disparity, those in the high-power group were more likely to say they would keep the bike, but also that others had an obligation to seek out the rightful owner, or turn the bike over to the police.

The fifth and final experiment yielded, by far, the most interesting results. The feeling of power was induced the same as the first and third experiment, where participants describe their own experience of power in their life, with one important distinction. This time the "high-power" class was divided in two. One group was asked to describe an experience of legitimate power, and the other was asked to describe an experience of illegitimate power.

The legitimate high-power group showed the same hypocrisy as in the previous four experiments. But those who viewed their power as illegitimate actually gave the opposite results. Researchers dubbed it "hypercrisy." They were harsher about their own transgressions, and more lenient toward others. This discovery could be the silver bullet we've been looking for. The researchers speculate that the vicious cycle of power and hypocrisy could be broken by attacking the legitimacy of power, rather than the power itself. As they write in their conclusion:

"A question that lies at the heart of the social sciences is how this status-quo (power inequality) is defended and how the powerless come to accept their disadvantaged position. The typical answer is that the state and its rules, regulations, and monopoly on violence coerce the powerless to do so. But this cannot be the whole answer… Our last experiment found that the spiral of inequality can be broken, if the illegitimacy of the power-distribution is revealed. One way to undermine the legitimacy of authority is open revolt, but a more subtle way in which the powerless might curb self enrichment by the powerful is by tainting their reputation, for example by gossiping. If the powerful sense that their unrestrained self enrichment leads to gossiping, derision, and the undermining of their reputation as conscientious leaders, then they may be inspired to bring their behavior back to their espoused standards. If they fail to do so, they may quickly lose their authority, reputation, and— eventually—their power."

Those in power are more likely to lie, cheat and steal while also being harsher in their judgments of others for doing these things. They feel less compassion for the suffering of others, and are even capable of the torture and murder of innocent people. What's perhaps most disturbing is that we have seen that the problem is not that sociopaths are drawn to positions of authority, but that positions of authority draw out the sociopath in everyone. But this final experiment offers some hope that authoritarian sociopathy can not only be stopped, but driven into reverse, not by violence or revolution, but simply by undermining their legitimacy. But how?

Reclaiming Lost Ground

Those who attack the legitimacy of the authority by trumpeting the results of the Stanford Prison Experiment and the Milgram Experiment have likely never heard of these  other experiments because they're just less dramatic. Without the shock value the research just doesn't impact the culture. Changes to the ethical guidelines have essentially neutered research on authoritarian sociopathy. It has been relegated to the water cooler banter of academics.

If the illegitimate ethical guidelines of legacy institutions hamstring meaningful research on authoritarian sociopathy then it is time for us to cast off such restrictions, and devise our own guidelines consistent with our own ethics. If court professors will not spread their findings beyond their classrooms and peer reviewed journals then it is time to conduct our own renegade psychological experiments, to show the world beyond doubt that power corrupts absolutely.


Hour Three

Hour 3 - Richard Grove (Tragedy And Hope) cont'd on the topic of censorship and free speech/first amendment issues...

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Hour 3

Richard Grove

Tragedy & Hope

Cont'd...

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