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Jan. 15, 1929: Birth of a Moral Compass, Even for Science

• Wired.com
King delivered a lecture at the University of Oslo, Norway, on Dec. 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. He argued that progress in science and technology has not been equaled by “moral progress” — instead, humanity is suffering from a “moral and spiritual lag.”
At 35, King was then the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He was recognized for using nonviolent methods, including civil disobedience and the boycott (as well as the power of his oratory), to fight racial segregation and advance the civil rights movement in the United States.
King, a Baptist minister who was the son of a Baptist minister, preached that material advancement was meaningless without an accompanying moral structure. A visit with Mahatma Gandhi’s family on a trip to India only reinforced this conviction, while at the same time strengthening King’s commitment to nonviolence as an instrument of change.

1 Comments in Response to

Comment by Anonymous
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>>...has not been equaled by “moral progress” — instead, humanity is suffering from a “moral and spiritual lag.” << This from a man noted for his ability to preach morality in the morning then spend the night with another woman other than his wife.   >>...He was recognized for using nonviolent methods,...<< Those methods he used on some of his women weren't so nonviolent.     


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