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News Link • Prepping

5 Perennials Preppers Should Consider

• http://www.theprepperjournal.com, By R. Ann Parris

The flip side of that is that most perennials require at least a year or two to establish, many 4-10 years, and fruit/nut perennials could need 10-20 years before they start producing a reasonable yield. A lot of the fruiting perennials are one-offs per year, as well. There are some with longer harvest seasons, but it's not like an annual garden where in some cases we have the potential to plant four different things in a space per year, and tree and shrub fruit isn't usually like lettuces or spinach that we can repeatedly harvest from the same plant.

On the other hand, once they're established, most perennials don't really need us a whole lot, unlike annuals, and trees need us even less than smaller shrubs and perennial plants. Perennials can be highly multi-function, with additional roles such as nitrogen fixation that can improve soils around them, soil stabilizing roots, pollinator habitat and food sources, livestock fodder or forage in the form of green limbs and leaves or tree hay, and medicinal value. Some can be coppiced or selectively pruned to provide us with kindling, rocket stove fuel and mulching chips.

Here I'll stay away from trees like apples and plums that are so commonly grafted and are super susceptible to diseases and pests. They tend to need us, and they tend to be pretty recognizable. Instead, we'll look at some other options. Most of the ones I'll recommend are largely free of pests.

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