Article Image
News Link • Cyberspace and the New Economy

Artificial Intelligence and Ethics on the Road to Superintelligence

• Whyfuture.com

The human brain, consisting of roughly 86 billion neurons, rivals the world's best supercomputers in terms of magnitude, efficiency, and speed, using as little energy as a small 20-watt light bulb. Human evolution took tens of thousands of years to adapt noticeable brain size and architecture changes.

     

Evolution is a slow process that can take eons for changes to occur.  Technology, on the other hand, is amazing in terms of how fast it is moving along, blending into the world seamlessly. The technological evolution notably occurs at a faster pace compared to biological evolution.  

To further understand the situation, imagine a frog in a pot of water that heats up 1/10th of a degree Celsius every ten seconds. Even if the frog remained in that water for, say an hour, it would be unable to feel the minute changes in temperature. However, if the frog is dropped into boiling water, the change is too sudden and the frog jumps away to avoid fate.

The Future of Artificial Intelligence and Ethics on the Road to Superintelligence

July 1, 2016

The human brain, consisting of roughly 86 billion neurons, rivals the world's best supercomputers in terms of magnitude, efficiency, and speed, using as little energy as a small 20-watt light bulb. Human evolution took tens of thousands of years to adapt noticeable brain size and architecture changes.

                     

Evolution is a slow process that can take eons for changes to occur.  Technology, on the other hand, is amazing in terms of how fast it is moving along, blending into the world seamlessly. The technological evolution notably occurs at a faster pace compared to biological evolution.  

To further understand the situation, imagine a frog in a pot of water that heats up 1/10th of a degree Celsius every ten seconds. Even if the frog remained in that water for, say an hour, it would be unable to feel the minute changes in temperature. However, if the frog is dropped into boiling water, the change is too sudden and the frog jumps away to avoid fate.  

Let's take a gigantic chessboard and a grain of rice, for scale, and place each grain of rice to a corresponding chess square following a sequence: for each passing square, we double the amount. Upon applying this, we get:

1) 1

2) 2

3) 4

4) 8

And so on. You must be thinking, "What difference does doubling a grain of rice for every box make?" But one must remember that, at some point, the number from which the count started will be totally indistinguishable to the end result. Still on the 41th square,

Join us on our Social Networks:

 

Share this page with your friends on your favorite social network:


http://freedomsphoenix.thinkpenguin.com/