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News Link • Robots and Artificial Intelligence

Everyone thinks that automation will take our jobs. The evidence disagrees.

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Last year, the Japanese company SoftBank opened a cell phone store in Tokyo and staffed it entirely with sales associates named Pepper. This wasn't as hard as it sounds, since all the Peppers were robots.

Humanoid robots, to be more precise, which SoftBank describes as "kindly, endearing, and surprising." Each Pepper is equipped with three multidirectional wheels, an anticollision system, multiple sensors, a pair of arms, and a chest-mounted tablet that allows customers to enter information. Pepper can "express his own emotions" and use a 3-D camera and two HD cameras "to identify movements and recognize the emotions on the faces of his interlocutors."

The talking bot can supposedly identify joy, sadness, anger, and surprise and determine whether a person is in a good or bad mood—abilities that Pepper's engineers figured would make "him" an ideal personal assistant or salesperson. And sure enough, there are more than 10,000 Peppers now at work in SoftBank stores, Pizza Huts, cruise ships, homes, and elsewhere.

In a less anxious world, Pepper might come across as a cute technological novelty. But for many pundits and prognosticators, he's a sign of something much more grave: the growing obsolescence of human workers. (Images of the doe-eyed Pepper have accompanied numerous articles with variations on the headline "robots are coming for your job.")

Over the past few years, it has become conventional wisdom that dramatic advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have put us on the path to a jobless future. We are living in the midst of a "second machine age," to quote the title of the influential book by MIT researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, in which routine work of all kinds—in manufacturing, sales, bookkeeping, food prep—is being automated at a steady clip, and even complex analytical jobs will be superseded before long. A widely cited 2013 study by researchers at the University of Oxford, for instance, found that nearly half of all jobs in the US were at risk of being fully automated over the next 20 years. The endgame, we're told, is inevitable: The robots are on the march, and human labor is in retreat.

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