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IPFS News Link • Vaccines and Vaccinations

Fact check: COVID-19 vaccines don't cause magnetic reactions or contain tracking devices

• USA Today

As the COVID-19 vaccine rollout continues, albeit slower compared to previous weeks, and the age eligibility expands to include children 12 and older, one social media post is revisiting fears stirred early on during the pandemic.

The May 10 Instagram post from an account called Keep_Canada_Free shows a video of an unidentified masked woman demonstrating with a small silver magnet that appears to stick to one arm, where she supposedly received the Pfizer shot, but not the other, unvaccinated arm.  

"You go figure it out. We're chipped," she tells her viewers.

The 25-second video has had over 20,000 views on Instagram and has been shared on social media platforms such as Twitter, where a resized version posted on May 8 also includes the claim the vaccine has "magnetic reactions." 

Fact check:India's COVID-19 surge not connected to vaccinations

It's unclear whether the woman was actually vaccinated or used a real magnet – USA TODAY reached out to Keep_Canada_Free for comment – but one thing is clear: The COVID-19 vaccines don't cause magnetic reactions or contain tracking devices.


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