Frosty Wooldridge


More About: Politics: General Activism

A multicultural society is not logical or workable

“A multicultural society is a physical and sociological impossibility.” Satoshi Kanazawa, college professor
One look around the globe shows that religious and cultural factions fight and kill one another with accelerating violence as they come in closer competition for water, energy, land and food.  One look at Lebanon, United Kingdom, Holland, France, Norway, Iraq and many other countries where cultures co-exist—amply illustrates Kanazawa’s contention.
Another look around the world shows that cultures compete for dominance in every country where cultures attempt to co-exist.  It doesn’t work in Canada or Mexico.  It’s not working in the United States of America.
Racial and cultural unrest checker every year of every decade of America’s existence. It smolders and simmers under the surface in 2012.  The more incompatible cultures imported into America, they will boil over and scald many in the years ahead.
What is culture?
Edward Tylor said that culture is, "That complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, law, morals, custom, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by man as a member of society."  Of course, it is not limited to men.  Women possess and create it as well.  Since Tylor's time, the concept of culture has become the central focus of anthropology.
“Culture is a powerful human tool for survival, but it is a fragile phenomenon,” said Tylor. “It is constantly changing and easily lost because it exists only in our minds.  Our written languages, governments, buildings, and other man-made things are merely the products of culture.  They are not culture in themselves.  For this reason, archaeologists cannot dig up culture directly in their excavations.  The broken pots and other artifacts of ancient people that they uncover are only material remains that reflect cultural patterns--they are things that were made and used through cultural knowledge and skills.”
In 2012, many western countries like Canada, France, Norway, Sweden and others find their own cultures being usurped if not destroyed by mass immigration. 
Can cultures co-exist in the same country? Answer: no!
“When I used to teach “Introduction to Sociology” at the University of Washington, I had back-to-back lectures during the first week on culture and society,” said Kanazawa. “I explained to my students that culture and society were two sides of a coin; one cannot exist without the other.  Culture needs society (and its inhabitants) to sustain its existence and initiate its change, and society needs culture to hold it together and survive.  Just as there is no such thing as a coin with only one side, there is no such thing as culture without society or society without culture.  It is physically impossible to construct a coin with only heads without tails or a coin with only tails without heads.  It is equally impossible to have a culture without society or a society without culture.”
When any society begins to speak multiple languages via immigration, it begins to fracture as to communication among its citizenry.  Once communications and “similar thinking” fragment, balkanization and separation ensue.  Today in America, Muslims cannot and do not assimilate into American culture or any Western cultures. They enclave.  The same holds true for Mexicans in America.  They separate into their own barrios.  It’s  not racist; it’s biological; it’s tribal.
“As an integral aspect of human culture, language cannot exist without a society of speakers speaking it daily and interacting with each other,” said Kanazawa. “Nobody disputes these truisms about culture and society from the social sciences, yet the same people also claim that we now live in a “multicultural society.”  If you think about it for a moment, you’d realize that the notion of “multicultural society” is a logical and physical impossibility.  It is similar to a coin with only one head but several tails.  It is physically impossible to construct such a coin.”
Kanazawa exposes the obvious.  Competing cultures cannot and do not work within a country. It goes against millions of years of human activity.
Can multiple societies exist within a civilization?  Can one coin
possess one head and two tails?  Answer: no!
“That culture needs society to sustain its existence means that multiple
cultures require multiple societies,” said Kanazawa.  “That society needs culture to hold it together means that multiple societies require multiple cultures.  There must be exactly the same number of cultures as there are societies, just as there must be exactly the same number of societies as there are cultures.  In any bag of coins, regardless of how many coins there are, there are exactly as many heads as there are tails, and vice versa.  One culture, one society.  “Multicultural society” is a physical (and sociological) impossibility.”
If the United States and Canada or Western Europe hope to survive in the 21st century as viable and cohesive societies, they must curtail mass immigration from incompatible cultures.  If they fail to take action, they will face endless strife for their citizens as well as the immigrants. 
Multiculturalism doesn’t work on every level of human interaction.
As resources diminish, food grows scarcer and energy depletes, we will witness more clashing cultures within all Western countries that imported large numbers from incompatible cultures.
Samuel Huntington, author of Clash of Civilizations, said it rather logically: It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.”
Frosty Wooldridge has bicycled across six continents - from the Arctic to the South Pole - as well as eight times across the USA, coast to coast and border to border. In 2005, he bicycled from the Arctic Circle, Norway to Athens, Greece. In 2012, he bicycled coast to coast across America.  His latest book is: How to Live a Life of Adventure: The Art of Exploring the World by Frosty Wooldridge, copies at 1 888 280 7715/ Motivational program: How to Live a Life of Adventure: The Art of Exploring the World by Frosty Wooldridge, click:

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