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Law Enforcers or Peace Officers

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Carlos Miller

An Indiana man gets pulled over for suspicion of DUI. He passes a breathalyzer.

Police still believe he is drunk so they take him to a hospital, strap him to a gurney and force a catheter into his penis.

Then they stick a needle in him to remove blood.

When a blood and urine test determined Jamie Lockard was still under the legal limit, police charged him with obstruction of justice.

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Arizona Daily Star

A former high-ranking U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent who had worked in Nogales, Ariz., and had a residence in Green Valley has been arrested on suspicion of cocaine smuggling charges. The suspected criminal activity that Richard Padilla Cramer has been charged with occurred in 2007 while he was working as an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent in Guadalajara, Mexico, according to a criminal complaint issued on Aug. 28 by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Miami. 

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Arizona Daily Star

A Tohono O'odham police lieutenant has been placed on paid leave after he struck and killed a woman with his patrol vehicle. The lieutenant, whose name was not released, was patrolling on West San Xavier Loop Road about 2:30 a.m. Friday when the incident occurred, said Tohono O'odham police Chief Joseph Delgado.  

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The Agitator

In May of this year, Weiner was arrested by five FBI agents. The charge? Violating the federal Mann Act—a century-old law banning the transport of women across state lines for “immoral purposes.” Specifically, federal agents had posed as prostitutes on a chat room for a Memphis-based website called sugardaddyforme.com, a site aimed at pairing older wealthy men with young women.

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RadGeek

Chattanooga city government’s police force surrounding Heyward, by pointing guns at him, by hollering orders, and then — when he didn’t snap to and immediately obey their bellowed commands — by tasering him down to the ground. And then lighting him up with 59 shots after he’d already been knocked to the ground when he moved to get up.

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LA Weekly

Three years ago, Los Angeles School Police Officer Ian Mitchell King walked into a high school ceramics class at University Senior High School in West L.A. and asked an attractive blonde senior to take a “stroll” with him to his on-campus security office. There, he told her to sit on his couch and declared, “This is about us. I’ve taken a personal interest in you.”

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Photography is not a Crime

It was his first day in Miami and Jordan Chusid got an intimate look at how aggressive cops can be down here.

The twentysomething college student had just transferred to the University of Miami from the University of Central Florida when two cops pulled their guns on him, ordering him to get down.

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AP

But what was supposed to be a day of fun at an end-of-summer festival ended abruptly when police shot Grose with a Taser in a dispute about where to end the parade route.

The incident nearly incited a riot as outraged neighbors rushed to his defense. Now residents of this tight-knit town of 2,400 are seething over what they see as police brutality, and town officials are scrambling to ease the tension.

 

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The Agitator

Developing story in Georgia, where church pastor Jonathan Ayers was shot and killed by undercover narcotics officers during a botched drug sting on Tuesday afternoon. Ayers was not the target of the investigation.

Police were apparently after a woman Ayers had dropped off just prior to stopping at the convenience store where police confronted him. Surveillance video shows a black SUV pulling up to the store, and plain-clothes officers jumping out with their guns drawn before the vehicle has stopped. Ayers’ car then backs into the picture, and the officers fire into his car as he drives off. Ayers was shot in the liver, crashed his car a short distance later, and died at the hospital the bullet wound.

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Photography Is Not A Crime

Nappi says he was Tased because he refused to stop filming. The officer says he was Tased because Nappi swung at him, hitting him in the chest with a closed fist (but also holding a bottle of water) that left the officer “momentarily disoriented.”

But the officer also acknowledges that the reason he approached Nappi in the first place was because he refused to hand over his camera.

 

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WALB

Dougherty County School Police are investigating a complaint of excessive force against a sixth grade girl arrested for protesting having her picture taken.

Her father shows scratches on 11-year-old Treneashe Graddy's neck and back. She says she was thrown to the ground and arrested at Southside Middle School.

When school officials tried to take her picture for school identification, she refused because her hair was not fixed.

 

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Injustice Everywhere

Since this week seems to be dedicated to The “Learning” Channel’s apparent attempt to promote police brutality through their advertising campaign for the “Police Women of Broward County” series, I figured it would be interesting to see how TLC would apply their pro-brutality advertising campaign, which includes gems like “Taser Time!“, “Cavity Search Anyone?” and “It’s always a good time to taser someone!” to other acts of police misconduct elsewhere.

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Miami Herald

Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers doles out cash for tipsters who turn in criminals.

But one of their own -- a Miami officer taking tips -- used the inside information to rip off thousands of dollars in reward money, authorities said.

Officer Wayne Fortella, an 11-year Miami police veteran, was charged Wednesday with wire fraud and conspiracy in Miami federal court. Two of his friends, who allegedly collected the Crime Stoppers payments at Wachovia banks, were also charged. One is at large.

 

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Officer.com

A routine traffic stop in St. Charles County two weeks ago has set federal agents on the trail of some kind of international intrigue they do not yet fully understand. It started Aug. 6 on Interstate 70, when St. Charles County sheriff's deputies stopped a black BMW suspected of speeding. The driver, Constatin Puiu, offered a Utah drivers license and told deputies he was returning home from Florida. [The comments are rather interesting]

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Photography Is Not A Crime

A 43-year-old man was jailed for six hours – and had his camera and memory card confiscated by a judge - after filming an FBI building from across the street in New York City Monday.

Randall Thomas, a professional photographer, said he was standing on the corner of Duane Street and Broadway in downtown Manhattan when he used his video camera to pan up and down on the 42-story building at 26 Federal Plaza.

He was immediately accosted by a security guard in a brown uniform who told him he was not allowed to film the building.

Thomas asserted his legal right to film from a public street. The guard called a Homeland Security Officer who asked Thomas what he was filming.

“I said ‘that’s none of your business,’” Thomas said in a telephone interview with Photography is Not a Crime Wednesday night.

 

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Photography Is Not A Crime

Before, it would take a high profile incident like a University of Florida student trying to ask John Kerry some hard questions - only to end up getting Tased and carted away - to generate any national news coverage.

And that was only because the student’s final words - “Don’t Tase me, bro” - were turned into a national punchline.

But nobody is laughing now.

Americans are beginning to realize that all they have to do is catch the cop on the wrong day at the wrong time and they can wind up with 50,000 volts of electricity ripping through their body.

 

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Snitching Blog

Snitching Blog is devoted to a part of our criminal system that most people know little or nothing about: criminal informants, or "snitches."   At any given moment, thousands of informants are in the system trying to work off their own criminal liability by giving information to the government. These informants may be in court, in prison, on the street, or in the workplace.   Police and prosecutors often rely heavily on information obtained from snitches. This is especially true in drug enforcement, but also for investigations of white collar crime, organized crime, and terrorism.   In fact, it is impossible to fully understand the U.S. legal system without understanding snitching. Nevertheless, snitching remains shrouded in secrecy and confusion.

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Washington Post

...but on this day I drove due to the expected late evening dinner. Driving down K Street toward Highway 66, I ran through a speed trap. I have a nice, expensive car -- with all the trimmings. Much to my chagrin, I'm sure I was speeding but not recklessly. More to the point, I was pulled over."

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KPHO TV5

A former Apache County sheriff who pleaded guilty to a felony charge in 2007 and resigned from office has now been hired as an investigator for the county prosecutor.   Brian Hounshell pleaded guilty to a charge of soliciting the misuse of public funds and 10 other public corruption charges were dropped. He was placed on three years probation and ordered to pay $15,000 in restitution and perform 1,000 hours community service.   He was hired this week by Apache County Attorney Michael Whiting, who told the Arizona Republic that he was the best man for the job.   Whiting also has hired former deputy Hugh Lynch, who was convicted of perjury in the same case.

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Injustice Everywhere

The introductory text of the bill asserts that it is designed to improve police accountability, however the actual language of the bill contains no provisions that would force police departments to investigate complaints or dictate any type of process that would improve accountability at all. In essence, it only gives police officers more rights and communities fewer rights in how they can police their own police.

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Daily Mail

'Residents called to complain there was an old scruffy man acting suspiciously,' said officer Spencer. 'It was an odd request because it was mid-afternoon. But it's an ethnic Latin area and the residents felt he didn't fit in.'

A female officer demanded to see his identification papers. 

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Blog of Bile video

He said she was speeding. She denied it and got out of the van. He told her to get back in. She did, then he ordered her back out.

He yanked her out by the arm, knocked her down with two Taser shots and charged her with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. His rationale on the disorderly conduct charge: She obstructed traffic when she got out of the van. The speeding accusation: going 50 mph in a 45-mph zone.

 

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