US Hostility Toward North Korea Won't Quit

Written by Subject: Korea/North Korea

US Hostility Toward North Korea Won't Quit

by Stephen Lendman (stephenlendman.org - Home - Stephen Lendman)

The US needs enemies to unjustifiably justify pursuit of its hegemonic aims. Throughout the post-WW II era, none existed — so they were invented.

US hostility toward the DPRK existed since the peninsula was divided. It's all about its sovereign independence, its refusal to subordinate it to US interests, and its legitimate military preparedness against feared US aggression.

Its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile deterrents are solely for defending the homeland. Throughout DPRK history, it never attacked another country, threatening none now except in self-defense if attacked, its legitimate right under international law.

Throughout the post-WW II period, it's been victimized by devastating US aggression and economic terrorism.

Its ruling authorities seek durable peace and stability on the peninsula, iron-clad security guarantees, unacceptable sanctions lifted, a formal end to the 1950s war, and normalized relations with the US, the West, and regional nations for the first time in its history.

Two Kim Jong-un/Trump summits failed to achieve Pyongyang's objectives because of US bad faith — making one-sided demands in return for empty promises, further evidence that the US can never be trusted under either right wing of the one-party state.

Last spring, Kim urged Trump to engage in evenhanded talks going forward, saying:

"Until the end of the year, I will be patient, I will wait for the US president, although it will be difficult to come up with an opportunity as good as it was last time" when both leaders met in Hanoi last February, adding: 

He'll only meet with Trump for another round of summit talks if "constructive decisions for the improvement of relations" are agreed to by the US.

"If we want to hold the third summit with proper attitude and proper solutions, which we are ready to share with our partners, then we would like to give it one more try."

"As President Trump continues to note, personal relations between (us) are not as hostile as the relations between our two nations. We still enjoy good relations and, if we think so, we can exchange letters."

Summits in Singapore (June 2018) and Hanoi (February 2019) achieved no breakthroughs. Nor is a third Kim/Trump summit likely to fare better — because the US doesn't negotiate.

It demands other nations bend to its will, seeking dominance over them, their resources and people, what its hegemonic rage is all about.

In mid-November, an unnamed senior Trump regime official commented on East Asian and Pacific affairs, saying the following on North Korea:

The US "remains prepared to defend ourselves and our allies from any attack or provocation" by Pyongyang — knowing its ruling authorities threaten no one.

On Thanksgiving Day, the neocon/CIA house organ Washington Post falsely said North Korea's announced break-off of nuclear talks "at the end of this year (means a) return to a dangerous pattern of provocation and escalation (sic)," adding:

Is Trump "prepared for that huge challenge" — that doesn't exist? North Korea wisely wants either evenhanded talks or none at all, the latter most likely because negotiating in good faith isn't in the US vocabulary.

A DPRK statement said "(w)e are no longer interested in…talks that bring nothing to us. As we have got nothing in return, we will no longer gift the US president with something he can boast of…"

Washington seeks dominance over other nations, mutual cooperation with none. 

While bipartisan US hardliners would love having North Korea on its side against China, there's virtually no possibility that Pyongyang would abandon its most valued ally — notably not by shifting allegiance to a nation that waged hot war and economic terrorism on it since the peninsula was divided.

On Thursday, North Korea reportedly launched two short-range missiles that fell harmlessly in waters around 230 miles offshore.

In early November, the DPRK military tested what it called "super-large multiple rocket launchers."

The US, other western nations and Israel routinely test weapons repeatedly without incident. North Korea is legally entitled to do the same thing without criticism.

The right of self-defense is fundamental in international law. 

Given the overwhelming threat posed by US imperial aims, it's essential for DPRK leadership to pursue whatever it takes to provide security for the nation and its people.

Make no mistake. North Korea wants peace, security, mutual cooperation with other countries, and equal rights membership in the world community of nations.

Longstanding US hostility toward the country continues to be an insurmountable obstacle.

VISIT MY WEBSITE: stephenlendman.org (Home - Stephen Lendman). Contact at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

My newest book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: How the US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html

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