This Internet provider pledges to put your privacy first. Al 
Freedom's Phoenix – "Uncovering the Secrets and Exposing the Lies"
 

Gold: $1202.00  Change: $0.00
Silver: $16.46  Change: $0.02
  Tragedy & Hope Bitcoin Fundraiser  
Current Bitcoin
Price:
$354.1

Provided by
BitPay.com
 
Contribute Bitcoin to
Freedom's Phoenix



Contribute Funding by
PayPal or Credit Card

 
Sign-up for FREE
Daily Newsletter
Log-In

See Complete Menu

Special Editions
Translate Page
RSS Feeds
 


Declare Your
Independence

with Ernest Hancock

 
Log-In
Front Page
Page Two
 
 

Freedom's Phoenix
Online Magazine

 
Freedom Forum
Letters to the Editor
Report The News
 

Anarchives:

 

 

Search by Keyword

    Contents by Subject
    Radio/TV Shows
    Feature Articles
    Opinion Columns
    News Stories
    Newsletters List
    Reference Links
 
 

Marc J. Victor - AttorneyForFreedom.com
 
Quantum Vibe
 
Don\\\'t Tread On Meme
 

This Internet provider pledges to put your privacy first. Always.

News Link  •  Privacy Rights

This Internet provider pledges to put your privacy first. Always.


04-12-2012  •  CNET News 

Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy with a concept as simple as it is ingenious: a telecommunications provider designed from its inception to shield its customers from surveillance.
Merrill, 39, who previously ran a New York-based Internet provider, told CNET that he's raising funds to launch a national "non-profit telecommunications provider dedicated to privacy, using ubiquitous encryption" that will sell mobile phone service and, for as little as $20 a month, Internet connectivity.
The ISP would not merely employ every technological means at its disposal, including encryption and limited logging, to protect its customers. It would also -- and in practice this is likely more important -- challenge government surveillance demands of dubious legality or constitutionality.
A decade of revelations has underlined the intimate relationship between many telecommunications companies and Washington officialdom. Leading providers including AT&T and Verizon handed billions of customer telephone records to the National Security Agency; only Qwest refused to participate. Verizon turned over customer data to the FBI without court orders. An AT&T whistleblower accused the company of illegally opening its network to the NSA, a practice that the U.S. Congress retroactively made legal in 2008.
By contrast, Merrill says his ISP, to be run by a non-profit called the Calyx Institute with for-profit subsidiaries, will put customers first. "Calyx will use all legal and technical means available to protect the privacy and integrity of user data," he says.
Merrill is in the unique position of being the first ISP exec to fight back against the Patriot Act's expanded police powers -- and win.
Nick Merrill, who once challenged a demand from the FBI for user data, is planning to create the world's first privacy-protective Internet and mobile phone provider.
Nick Merrill says that "we will use all legal and technical means to resist having to hand over information, and aspire to be the partner in the telecommunications industry that ACLU and EFF have always needed but never had."
(Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)
In February 2004, the FBI sent Merrill a secret "national security letter" (not an actual court order signed by a judge) asking for confidential information about his customers and forbidding him from disclosing the letter's existence. He enlisted the ACLU to fight the gag order, and won. A federal judge barred the FBI from invoking that portion of the law, ruling it was "an "unconstitutional prior restraint of speech in violation of the First Amendment."
Merrill's identity was kept confidential for years as the litigation continued. In 2007, the Washington Post published his anonymous op-ed which said: "I resent being conscripted as a secret informer for the government," especially because "I have doubts about the legitimacy of the underlying investigation." He wasn't able to discuss his case publicly until 2010.
His recipe for Calyx was inspired by those six years of interminable legal wrangling with the Feds: Take wireless service like that offered by Clear, which began selling 4G WiMAX broadband in 2009. Inject end-to-end encryption for Web browsing. Add e-mail that's stored in encrypted form, so even Calyx can't read it after it arrives. Wrap all of this up into an easy-to-use package and sell it for competitive prices, ideally around $20 a month without data caps, though perhaps prepaid for a full year.
"The idea that we are working on is to not be capable of complying" with requests from the FBI for stored e-mail and similar demands, Merrill says.
 
 
Read Full Story
Reported by Chip Saunders

Join us on our
Social Networks

Share this page with your friends
on your favorite social network:

     
Additional related items you might find interesting:
Feature Article  •  More about Privacy Rights
Why the US Postal Service Turned Spy
Mark Nestmann
News Link  •  Privacy Rights
Court Rules Police Can Force Users to Unlock iPhones With Fingerprints, But Not Passcodes
11-03-2014  •  macrumors.com 
News Link  •  Privacy Rights
Local Cops Say Your Driving History Is Public — Unless You Want a Copy
10-18-2014  •  https://firstlook.org, By Dan Novack 
Tags: merrill, fbi, homeland, surveillance, secure, encrypted, internet, cell, att, verizon, patriot act,
      Agorist Marketplace  
 
  Magazine / Newspaper
   Magazine Subscription Info
   Online Magazine List
   Newspaper Subscription Info
   Newspaper Issue List
 
RSS Feeds
   Articles RSS Feed
   Opinions RSS Feed
   Media RSS Feed
   Newsletter RSS Feed
   Smartphone Feed
   Podcast Feed
Radio / TV
   Declare Your Independence
      with Ernest Hancock

Anarchives
   Search by Keyword
   Contents Listed by Subject
   Radio / TV Show Archives
   Newsletter Archives
   News Links
   Feature Articles
   Opinion Columns
   Reference Links

 
Letters to the Editor
   List of Letters
   Write a Letter

 
Join Us
   Subscribe to Magazine
   Membership Sign-Up
   Be a Writer
   Be a Reporter
   Link to Us

 
Marketplace
   Buy Stuff – Sell Stuff

   Store on CafePress.com
More News
   Page Two
   Current News
 
Discussions
   Freedom Forum
 
Advertise
   Intro to Advertising with Us
   Magazine Advertising Rates
   Radio Advertising Rates
   Website Advertising Rates
 
Funding Center
   Support or Promote a Project
About Freedom's Phoenix
   About Us
   Contact Us
   Terms of Use
   Privacy Policy
   Writers List

 
Tutorials – Using This Site
   List of Tutorials
 
Media Resources
   News References
   Blog References
   Government References
 
  FreedomsPhoenix.com
The domain and name of this website are servicemarks of Ernest Hancock.
Website is Copyright © 2014 by Ernest Hancock.  All rights reserved worldwide.
4886 W Port Au Prince Ln, Glendale, AZ 85306 USA.
Website Designed by
USA Web
Advertising

Phoenix, Arizona
 
Time to display page: 0.688 Seconds -- Dynamic Page

Page Views:

free web stats

Stats by StatCounter