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News Link • Surveillance

The Ghost of Ronald Reagan Authorizes Most NSA Spying

• By Cora Currier and Ryan Devereaux

U.S. intelligence agents have broad authority to spy on U.S. companies as long as they are "believed to have some relationship with foreign organizations or persons" — a description that could conceivably apply to any company with foreign shareholders, subsidiaries, or even employees—according to newly released government documents published this morning by the ACLU.

The trove, which includes documents from the NSA, Department of Justice, and Defense Intelligence Agency, confirms long-standing suspicions that the bulk of U.S. foreign surveillance operations are governed not by acts of Congress, but by a 33-year-old executive order issued unilaterally by President Ronald Reagan.

The documents were released in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by the ACLU and the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic at Yale Law School, and they detail the extent of the order — which is extraordinarily broad and until recently largely obscure — and which underpins expansive U.S. surveillance programs, like siphoning internet traffic from Google and Yahoo's overseas data centers, recording every call in the Bahamas, and gathering billions of records on cellphone locations around the world.

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