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IPFS News Link • Philanthropy

Tolstoy's Letters to Gandhi on Love, Violence, and the Truth of the Human Spirit

• http://www.dailypaul.com, by Maria Popova

 On December 14, Tolstoy, who had spent the last twenty years seeking the answers to life's greatest moral questions, was moved to reply in a long letter, which Das published in the Indian newspaper Free Hindustan. Passed from hand to hand, the missive finally made its way to the young Mahatma Gandhi, whose career as a peace leader was just beginning in South Africa. He wrote to Tolstoy asking for permission to republish it in his own South African newspaper, Indian Opinion. Tolstoy's letter was later published in English under the title A Letter to a Hindu.

The exchange sparked an ongoing correspondence between the two that lasted until Tolstoy's death — a meeting of two great minds and spirits, eventually collected in Letters from One: Correspondence (and more) of Leo Tolstoy and Mohandas Gandhi and rivaled only by Einstein's correspondence with Freud on violence and human nature.

He considers how political ideologies hijacked this basic law of love at various times in human history and tried to replace it with a law of violent submission:

"This truth was made known to people who considered that a community could only be kept together if some of them restrained others, and so it appeared quite irreconcilable with the existing order of society… The dissemination of the truth in a society based on coercion was always hindered in one and the same manner, namely, those in power, feeling that the recognition of this truth would undermine their position, consciously or sometimes unconsciously perverted it by explanations and additions quite foreign to it, and also opposed it by open violence. Thus the truth — that his life should be directed by the spiritual element which is its basis, which manifests itself as love, and which is so natural to man—this truth, in order to force a way to man's consciousness, had to struggle not merely against the obscurity with which it was expressed and the intentional and unintentional distortions surrounding it, but also against deliberate violence, which by means of persecutions and punishments sought to compel men to accept religious laws authorized by the rulers and conflicting with the truth.


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