Article Image
News Link • Transportation

Your future vehicle will monitor your body fluids: New car monitors hydration levels ...

• https://www.naturalnews.com

(Natural News) There comes a point where technology transcends "cool and innovative" and just starts to become "creepy and weird."

In response to recent studies showing that driving while dehydrated can be just as bad as driving while inebriated, Nissan has unveiled a new high-tech feature that is capable of warning motorists when they need a drink of water.

In order to make the dehydration detectors a reality, Nissan teamed up with the Dutch design company Droog to install sweat-sensing material called SOAK into its Juke model. The material covers the steering wheel and the front seats, and changes from blue to yellow when it comes in contact with the driver's perspiration. Roughly two-thirds of all drivers don't know how to tell whether or not their body is receiving enough water – symptoms of dehydration include dizziness, fatigue, headache, a dry mouth, and slower reaction times.

According to a 2015 survey, 20 percent of patients go to the doctor with symptoms of dehydration, such as tiredness and dizziness. Additionally, only 4 percent of doctors said they believed their patients were aware of how much water they need to be drinking each day, which clearly demonstrates that there is a severe communication problem that must be addressed.

"While many athletes are well-versed on keeping hydrated, many people outside the sporting sphere remain unaware of the impact of dehydration on physiological performance," explained Dr. Harj Chaggar, a medical consultant for Nissan Motorsport. "Sweat-sensing technology built into a car is an innovative way of highlighting this, aiding prevention by warning the driver directly."

Nissan also noted that the sweat-censoring technology is a working concept, and that the automobile company currently has no plans to introduce it as an option for their customers.

While there are clear benefits to this new technology that Nissan has unveiled, for some, the idea of a car knowing when you're thirsty and when you're hydrated is a bit unnerving. It begs the question: If the cars that we drive will soon be able to tell when we need a glass of water, what else will they one day be capable of? (Related: New high tech cars may be damaging to your health.)

Join us on our Social Networks:

 

Share this page with your friends on your favorite social network:


GoldMoney