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Why People Will Happily Line Up to be Microchipped Like Dogs

• http://www.theorganicprepper.ca

So…some people actually want to be microchipped like a dog. They're lining up for it. They're having parties to get it done. It if isn't available to them, they're totally bummed out.

I'm not even going to venture into the religious aspect of having a microchip inserted into a human being. Let's just talk about the secular ramifications.

Certain folks won't be happy until everyone has a computer chip implanted in them. Here's how this could go.

Initially, it would be the sheep who blindly desire to be chipped for their own "convenience" leading the way.

Then, it would become remarkably inconvenient not to be chipped – sort of like it's nearly impossible to not have a bank account these days.

Then, the last holdouts could be forcibly chipped by law.

Read on, because I could not make this stuff up.

Some employers are chipping workers.

Last summer, the internet was abuzz about a company in Wisconsin that wanted to microchip their employees. Workers at the technology company, Three Market Square, were given the option of having a chip implanted in their hands and 50 out of 80 eagerly lined up for the privilege.

Why? So they could buy food or swipe their way through building security with a wave of their hand. Software engineer Sam Bengtson explained why he was on board.

"It was pretty much 100 percent yes right from the get-go for me. In the next five to 10 years, this is going to be something that isn't scoffed at so much, or is more normal. So I like to jump on the bandwagon with these kind of things early, just to say that I have it." (source)

He wasn't alone. In fact, they had a microchipping party and some people got chipped live on TV so the rest of us reluctant humans could all see how cool it was to get microchipped. Watch what fun they had!

It isn't just this American company chipping workers. Here's an example in Sweden.

What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish start-up hub Epicenter. The company offers to implant its workers and start-up members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

"The biggest benefit, I think, is convenience," said Patrick Mesterton, co-founder and chief executive of Epicenter. As a demonstration, he unlocks a door merely by waving near it. "It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys." (source)

Alessandro Acquisti, a professor of information technology and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz College, warns that this might not be a good idea. (Although it doesn't take a Ph.D. to realize this.)

"Companies often claim that these chips are secure and encrypted…But "encrypted" is "a pretty vague term," he said, "which could include anything from a truly secure product to something that is easily hackable."

Another potential problem, Dr. Acquisti said, is that technology designed for one purpose may later be used for another. A microchip implanted today to allow for easy building access and payments could, in theory, be used later in more invasive ways: to track the length of employees' bathroom or lunch breaks, for instance, without their consent or even their knowledge.

"Once they are implanted, it's very hard to predict or stop a future widening of their usage," Dr. Acquisti said. (source)

Pretty soon, experts say everyone will want to be microchipped.

Many sources say that it's inevitable that we're all going to get chipped. Noelle Chesley, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, says it's inevitable.

"It will happen to everybody. But not this year, and not in 2018. Maybe not my generation, but certainly that of my kids." (source)

Another pro-chipping advocate, Gene Munster, an investor and analyst at Loup Ventures, says that we just have to get past that silly social stigma and then everyone will be doing it within 50 years. Why? Oh, the benefits.

The company, which sells corporate cafeteria kiosks designed to replace vending machines, would like the kiosks to handle cashless transactions.

This would go beyond paying with your smartphone. Instead, chipped customers would simply wave their hands in lieu of Apple Pay and other mobile-payment systems.

The benefits don't stop there. In the future, consumers could zip through airport scanners sans passport or drivers license; open doors; start cars; and operate home automation systems. All of it, if the technology pans out, with the simple wave of a hand. (source)

There are other companies who are on board with chipping everyone.

At a recent tech conference, Hannes Sjöblad explained how a microchip implanted in his hand makes his life easier. It replaces all the keys and cards that used to clutter his pockets.

"I use this many times a day, for example, I use it to unlock my smart phone, to open the door to my office," Sjöblad said.

Sjöblad calls himself a biohacker. He explained, "We biohackers, we think the human body is a good start but there is certainly room for improvement."

The first step in that improvement is getting a microchip about size of a grain of rice slipped under the skin. Suddenly, the touch of a hand is enough to tell the office printer this is an authorized user.

The microchips are radio frequency identification tags. The same technology widely used in things like key cards. The chips have been implanted in animals for years to help identify lost pets and now the technology is moving to humans.

Tech start-up Dangerous Things has sold tens of thousands of implant kits for humans and some to tech companies in Europe.

Sjöblad said he even organizes implant parties where people bond over getting chipped together.  (source)

Will microchipping parties be the next generation of those outrageously expensive candle parties? Will folks be pimping microchips like they do those scented wax melts? Will it become some kind of MLM thing to make it even more socially acceptable?

A UK newspaper, the Sun, explains how awesome it is to be microchipped.

The woman sat next to you could be hiding an implant under the skin which slowly releases hormones to stop her from getting pregnant.

Nans and granddads across the nation come installed with cutting-edge technology installed just to boost their hearing and vision seeing or help them walk with comfort.

We're preparing ourselves for the next form of evolution in which humans will merge with artificial intelligence, becoming one with computers.

At least that's the belief of Dr. Patrick Kramer, chief cyborg officer at Digiwell, a company that claims to be dedicated to "upgrading humans". (source)

Seriously, who wouldn't want all that awesomeness in their lives?

There are some serious pitfalls

While the current chips being "installed" in humans are said not to have GPS tracking, don't you figure it's just a matter of time? And also, how do you KNOW that there is no GPS tracking technology in that teeny little chip? Just because they tell you so?

Then there is the issue of the chip in your body being hacked.

"This is serious stuff. We're talking about a nonstop potential connection to my body and I can't turn it off, I can't put it away, it's in me. That's a big problem," said Ian Sherr, an executive editor at CNET.

"It's very easy to hack a chip implant, so my advice is don't put your life secrets on an implant, Sjöblad said…
 

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