Contents Pages by Subject

Torture

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Daily Kos

What ABC didn't mention is that Bush is the head of the National Security Counsel and the 2002 NSC decision memo in question, shown at the bottom of this post, signed by George W. Bush, establishes that Bush was in 2002 indeed doing his

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Washington Post

Could the president, if he desired, have a prisoner's eyes poked out? Or, for that matter, could he have "scalding water, corrosive acid or caustic substance" thrown on a prisoner? How about slitting an ear, nose or lip, or disabling a

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Vanity Fair

As the first anniversary of 9/11 approached, and a prized Guantánamo detainee wouldn’t talk, the Bush administration’s highest-ranking lawyers argued for extreme interrogation techniques, circumventing international law, the Geneva Conventions, and t

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Harpers

The Guantánamo Commissions are being whipped ahead by the Bush Administration, but as things progress does anyone mistake this process for justice? Certainly not the participants. The military lawyers who serve as prosecutors, defense counsel and jud

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HuffPo

On October 4, 2007, Colonel Morris D. Davis resigned as chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, and he has devoted considerable time, ever since, to giving his reasons why. Confessions extracted from defendants under torture were to be admitted as eviden

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Raw Story

While the 8th Amendment [prohibits indefinite detention] as punishment for a crime, the CIA or military would be justified keeping a suspected insurgent or member of al Qaeda imprisoned forever if the detainee refused to answer questions.

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Reuters

A Canadian accused of killing a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan should not be tried as a war criminal because he was a child soldier for al Qaeda, too young to voluntarily join its forces, his military defense lawyer told a U.S. war court on Monday. N

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Washington Post

In Canada, the United States has joined a notorious group of countries as a place where foreigners risk torture and abuse, according to a training manual for Canadian diplomats that was accidentally given this week to Amnesty International lawyers.

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AP

The chief of the U.S. military said he favors closing the prison here as soon as possible. “I’d like to see it shut down,” Adm. Mike Mullen said, adding the negative publicity worldwide about treatment of terrorist suspects had been “pretty damaging”

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AP

Convicted terrorism conspirator Jose Padilla sued a key architect of the Bush administration's counterterrorism policies Friday, claiming the official's legal arguments led to Padilla's alleged mistreatment and illegal detention at a Navy

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NY Times OpEd

Those same lawyers then twisted other laws beyond recognition to allow Mr. Bush to turn intelligence agents into torturers, to force doctors to abdicate their professional oaths and responsibilities to prepare prisoners for abuse, and then to monitor

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Military

"It was with sadness that I signed my name this grey morning to a letter resigning my commission in the U.S. Navy," wrote attorney-at-law Andrew Williams. "There was a time when I served with pride ... Sadly, no more." Stems from

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Washington Post

The Bush administration has told a federal judge that terrorism suspects held in secret CIA prisons should not be allowed to reveal details [to their lawyers] of the "alternative interrogation methods" that their captors used to get them to

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Truthout (video)

Michael Ratner, president of the Center for Constitutional Rights believes the Bush administration is fighting to keep prisoners accused of terrorism-related activity out of court in order to prevent further evidence of torture from becoming public.

www.universityofreason.com/a/29887/KWADzukm