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Science, Medicine and Technology

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Aljazeera

Palaeontologists have uncovered the first dinosaur remains in Lebanon, adding evidence to the theory that millions of years ago, the Middle East was covered with forests where giant reptiles roamed.

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AP

South Korean prosecutors indicted disgraced cloning scientist Hwang Woo-suk Friday on charges of fraud, embezzlement and bioethics violations in a scandal over faked stem cell research that shook the scientific community.

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National Geographic

Dolphins give themselves "names"—distinctive whistles that they use to identify each other, new research shows. Scientists say it's the first time wild animals have been shown to call out their own names.

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Wired

Scientists have grown three-dimensional lung tissue using a "hydrogel." The home-grown organs could be used to repair the lungs of children who are born with insufficient lung development (which causes 2,800 newborn deaths in the US every y

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LiveScience.com

Imagine if your lawn was always green and never needed mowing. That's the goal of research at the Salk Institute, where scientists have mapped a hormone-signaling pathway that regulates plant height. Could lead to grass that rarely needs mowing.

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Associated Press

China successfully tested a locally made magnetic levitation train, the first time the country has achieved the feat without using foreign technology. The 20-ton test maglev train ran steadily on a 1,400-foot experimental line in the provincial capit

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Associated Press

In their quest to create the super warrior of the future, some military researchers aren't focusing on organs like muscles or hearts. They're looking at tongues.

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Associated Press

Scientists have discovered a mutant gene that triggers the body to form a second, renegade skeleton, solving the mystery of a rare disease called FOP that imprisons children in bone for life. Development of a drug to treat more common bone buildup re

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Reuters

If choosing the right outfit or whether to invest in stocks or bonds is difficult, it may not be just indecisiveness but how brain cells assign values to different items. "The neurons we have identified encode the value individuals assign to the

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Business Week

Entrepreneur Frank Baldino was touring the animal lab at a Paris drugmaker that was testing a new antidepressant. Rodents are nocturnal, so Baldino was stunned to see mice wide awake in the middle of the day. He decided to license the compound and te

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LiveScience.com

You might think a catfish on land would fare as well as an elephant on roller-skates, but a new study reveals they slither around and adeptly catch insect meals [Video].

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LiveScience.com

The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses the toughest glue on Earth to stick to river rocks, and now scientists are trying to figure out how to produce the stuff.The adhesive can withstand an enormous amount of stress, equal to the force felt by a q

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Reuters

Do you know where your friends are? You could give them a call, but if their mobile phones are equipped with the latest in satellite navigation, you could also go to a Web site such as Mologogo (www.mologogo.com) to find their whereabouts on a map, a

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Associated Press

The new find of several specimens looks more like a land-dweller than the few other fossil fish known from the transitional period, and researchers speculate it may have taken brief excursions out of the water. "It sort of blurs the distinction

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Palm Beach Post

They've spent as much as $65 million a year trying to solve a mystery that has underpinned religion and inspired thinkers: How did life on the lonely Earth begin? And is Earth really the only source of life in the universe? With the help of m

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LiveScience.com

Scientists have developed prototype spectacles that change prescriptions with the flick of a switch. University of Arizona researcher Guoqiang Li and colleagues developed the potential improvement to Benjamin Franklin's invention. Each lens consi

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Reuters

Surviving a rebel attack and braving crocodile-infested waters, a group of explorers has completed an 80-day voyage down the world's longest river reaching what they say is the source of the Nile, deep in Rwanda's lush Nyungwe rainforest.

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LiveScience.com (video link)

Scientists have found a molecule that can spin freely in liquid, clearing out water like a person swinging suitcases would clear a crowded room. The molecule spins without causing friction. That shouldn't be possible, according to a chemical phys

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Associated Press

German scientists say cells from the testes of mice can behave like embryonic stem cells. If the same holds true in humans, it could provide a controversy-free source of versatile cells for use in treating disease.

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USA Today

Early exposure to pets, peanuts and intestinal worms might actually be good for you, because they program the developing immune system to know the difference between real threats, such as germs, and Aunt Millie's cat.