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Science, Medicine and Technology

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LiveScience.com

Scientists have discovered a novel genetic repair process that allows a hardy desert microbe to die and resurrect over and over again. Could lead to new forms of regenerative medicines and might bring dead cells in our own bodies back to life.

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LiveScience.com

The zebra tarantula produces silk secretions from tiny nozzle-like structures at the tips of its feet. The substance helps the spiders stick to vertical surfaces, ensuring a slip-free trek up a steep wall.

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AP

The parasitic dodder plant doesn't have a nose, but it knows how to sniff out its prey. The dodder attacks such plants as tomatoes, carrots, onions, citrus trees, cranberries, alfalfa and even flowers, and is a problem for farmers because chemica

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AP

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., the U.S. unit of Swiss drugmaker Novartis AG said that at least three out of four patients given an experimental multiple sclerosis treatment were free of relapses for more than two years.

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Reuters

The 1918 Spanish Flu that killed up to 50 million people worldwide caused a severe immune response which may help to explain why it was so deadly. "What we think is happening is that the host's inflammatory response is being highly activated

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Reuters

Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul Allen decided to make a genetic atlas of the mouse brain. The atlas, begun in 2002 with $100 million from Allen's fortune, was declared finished on Tuesday, with fine-tuned information on 3,000 active genes -- a

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AP

Henrietta the chicken was living inconspicuously among 36,000 other birds at Brendle Farms for 18 months -- until a foreman noticed she had four legs. "It's as healthy as the rest," the farm's owner, Mark Brendle, told The Daily Ame

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LiveScience.com

The earliest known bird had flight feathers on its legs that allowed it to use its hindlimbs as an extra pair of wings. Supports the theory that early birds learned to glide and parachute from trees before achieving full-fledged flight.

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LiveScience.com

Scientists say they have created a stem cell line from a human embryo that had stopped developing naturally, and so was considered dead. Using such embryos might ease ethical concerns about creating such cells, they suggested.

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LiveScience.com

In just a few generations, the male crickets on Kauai underwent a drastic genetic change that rendered them incapable of belting out courtship songs. Typically, male field crickets sport curved wings, and by rubbing a sharp ridge of one wing with a r

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Reuters

Human embryonic stem cells can partly restore vision in blinded rats, and may offer a source of transplants for people with certain eye diseases, researchers at a U.S. company reported.

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LiveScience.com

Deterioration of body and mind are the prices our bodies pay for protection against cancer as we grow older, new studies suggest. Scientists have discovered that a gene involved in tumor suppression also plays an important role in determining when

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AP

Scientists combing through undersea fauna off Indonesia's Papua province said they had discovered dozens of new species, including a shark that walks on its fins and a shrimp that looks like a praying mantis.

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AP

A farm in Wisconsin is quickly becoming hallowed ground for American Indians with the birth of its third white buffalo, an animal considered sacred by many tribes for its potential to bring good fortune and peace.

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LiveScience.com

Chicken feathers and rice straw could become commonplace in clothing in the future. Turned their eyes to the millions of tons of rice straw and chicken feathers available cheaply, abundantly and renewably worldwide as farming byproducts.

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Reuters

Research suggests that healthy newborn infants do not have what doctors call "nasoaxillary reflex" -- a protective reflex that helps keep their nasal passages open. In adults lying on their side, the nasoaxillary reflex ensures that the

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Reuters

Scientists believe they may have finally identified the part of the brain that deals with the critical issue of matching words to everyday objects. Using brain scans of people suffering from Semantic Dementia they found the front end of the temporal

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LiveScience.com

The next several decades could prove a golden age for dinosaur hunters looking to discover new species of the ancient reptiles. A new statistical analysis predicts that more than 1,300 unique dinosaur genera await discovery by paleontologists.

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