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Science, Medicine and Technology

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Reuters

Nerve cells in the pancreas may be a cause of type-1 diabetes in mice. Defective nerve endings may attract immune system proteins that mistakenly attack the pancreas, destroying its ability to make insulin.

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NY Times

Discovered an extinct animal the size of a small squirrel that lived in China at least 125 million years ago and soared among the trees. Earliest known example of gliding flight by mammals, and shows that mammals experimented with aerial life about t

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AP

Scientists appear to have found a fingerprint of Alzheimer's disease lurking in patients' spinal fluid, a step toward a long-awaited test for the memory-robbing disease that today can be diagnosed definitively only at autopsy.

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AP

The bones of a baby plesiosaur have been recovered from an Antarctic island. In life, 70 million years ago, the five-foot-long long-necked animal .... The new fossil skeleton is one of the most complete of its type ever found.

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LiveScience.com

Peering deep into the sea, scientists are finding creatures more mysterious than many could have imagined. At one site, nearly 2 miles deep in the Atlantic, shrimp were living around a vent that was releasing water heated to 765 degrees Fahrenheit. W

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Reuters

They laid down a layer of nurturing proteins as a base, and then used a robotic inkjet-style machine to squirt tiny quantities of various proteins down on top, in a specific pattern. The mouse cells began to grow into bone-type cells

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LiveScience.com

The giant moray eel is normally a lone hunter in the dark. Now scientists find these eels may at times hunt in the daytime in the Red Sea, and surprisingly cooperate with another predatory fish, the grouper, which is also normally a solitary predator

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LiveScience.com

One nectar bat can launch its tongue one and a half times its body length, longer than any other mammal and second only to chameleons among vertebrates. The tube-lipped nectar bat (Anoura fistulata) was discovered in the cloud forests of the Andes of

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LiveScience.com

Emperor penguins dive below the Antarctic sea ice in search of food, they can descend 5 times as deep as a human and can swim on a single breath for up to 20 minutes. How they manage these incredible feats could potentially help improve surgical proc

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LiveScience.com

A recent study published by the National Academy of Sciences cast doubt on the reality of Gulf War Syndrome as a specific disease or syndrome. About 60,000 of the nearly 700,000 Gulf War veterans began reporting health problems in the months and year

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Cosmos

(No idea on topic) Bees have been trained to sniff out explosives, according to scientists at a US weapons laboratory, in a project they say could have far-reaching applications in national security and the war in Iraq.

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Reuters

An extremely rare and well-preserved dinosaur nest containing fossil eggs with the embryos exposed goes up for auction this weekend, but at least one scientist is demanding the artifact be returned to a museum.

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Reuters

A young woman, confined to a wheelchair, is told to think about moving another wheelchair in front of her, first to the left and then forward. As if by magic, the wheelchair follows her mental commands. "She was controlling the chair with her im

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LiveScience.com

Analysis of ancient sediment taken from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean support the view that the dinosaurs' extinction was caused by a single rogue meteor striking Earth, and not by multiple space rock impacts, a new study finds.

LiveScience.com

The strangely intricate wrinkles and grooves around the nostrils of many bats apparently could help them "see" in the dark by focusing their sonar, scientists in China have found. The discovery could help scientists improve sonar and rad

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LiveScience.com

Scientists made their first discovery of a volcanic eruption in progress 1.5 miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. The event was predicted at a site where earthquake activity had increased. The eruption was confirmed when eight of 12 seismome

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Space.com

Some 2.4 billion years ago when the Milky Way started upping its star production, cosmic rays started pouring onto our planet, causing instability within the living. Populations of bacteria and algae repeatedly soared and crashed in the oceans.

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Reuters

Humpback whales have a type of brain cell seen only in humans, the great apes, and other cetaceans such as dolphins. Might mean such whales are more intelligent than they have been given credit for, and suggests complex brains evolved more than once

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LiveScience.com

Scientists say they've discovered how a gene mutation linked to an inherited form of Parkinson's disease damages the brain. The LRRK2 gene produces malfunctioning proteins that stunt the normal growth and branching of dopamine-producing neuro

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