Contents Pages by Subject

Science, Medicine and Technology

Subject Photo
Article Image

Reuters

A new technique allowing virtual dissections of half-billion year old fossil embryos is producing the first three-dimensional images of the dawn of life. It reveals a universe of detail impossible using previous methods much as the electron microscop

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Next time someone complains about arithmetic being hard, math lovers can defend themselves by saying "even a six-month-old can do it." Through monitoring the brains of infants, researchers confirmed that infants as early as six months in

Article Image

LiveScience.com

As a leopard kitten matures into a prowling adult, its baby spots morph into more commanding rosette markings. Now scientists think they have uncovered the mechanism behind the transformation. Biologists have long wondered how leopards and other m

Article Image

USA Today

If you think it's a long trip to the local supermarket, consider the sooty shearwater. This tiny seabird flies an astounding 40,000 miles in 200 days, covering the entire Pacific Ocean in search of food. It is the longest animal migration recorde

Article Image

Reuters

[Now if we could test it in DC's water supply...] A German scientist has been testing an "anti-stupidity" pill with encouraging results on mice and fruit flies. The pill thwarts hyperactivity in certain brain nerve cells, helping stabil

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Whether in a bar or on the battlefield, it’s easier to fight knowing friends have your back. The same is true in the ant world. A new study shows ants are more aggressive when they think they’re part of a larger group.

Article Image

Reuters

The scientists found that faults in the p53 gene, which stops damaged cells from dividing, and in the p16 gene, which helps to regulate and prevent cancer from developing, were two changes linked to more aggressive tumors.

Article Image

Live Science

If your doctor suggests you're the perfect candidate for some clinical trial, you might as how much he's getting paid to recruit you. Finders fees from $2,000 to $5,000 are common, says University of Toronto researchers Trude Lemmens and Pau

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Using a new genetic mapping technique, scientists say they found more than 20,000 different types of microbe in a single liter of water from deep sites in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. "These observations blow away all previous estimates o

Article Image

LiveScience.com

A British bumblebee has set a record for long-distance flight, finding its way home after being dropped off 8 miles away. Nobody knows if other bees have flown farther—few tests have been done—but this flight is about 5 miles more than scientists

Article Image

AP

Scientists have identified two ancient reptiles that swam in icy waters off Australia 115 million years ago, researchers said. They are among the first of their kind to be found from the period soon after the Jurassic era.

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Humans aren't the only creatures that vocalize during sex. While mating, female Physocylus globosus spiders emit high-frequency squeaks to let males know what they should be doing, a new study finds.

Article Image

AP

Researchers say they have come closer to unlocking the secrets of earthquake prediction by uncovering a link between tiny, almost imperceptible, tremors deep inside the earth and devastating quakes capable of wiping out cities.

Article Image

Arizona Daily Star

A University of Arizona professor has invented a sticker that can tell consumers if a fruit or vegetable is ripe. The stickers will be available to growers next year, and should make their way to supermarkets within two to three years, said their inv

Article Image

LiveScience.com

A new technology allows researchers to write on water. The AMOEBA (Advanced Multiple Organized Experimental Basin), a circular tank created by Mitsui Engineering at their Akishima laboratory, is able form letters with standing waves.

Article Image

LiveScience.com

The triangular shark fin that sends frightened swimmers scrambling to shore is made using the same genes that help form the arms and legs of humans. Researchers found that about a dozen genes that help give rise to a shark's median fins—those tha

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Scientists have extracted intact bone marrow from the fossilized remains of 10-million-year-old frogs and salamanders. The finding is the first case of fossilized bone marrow ever to be discovered and only the second report of fossilized soft tiss

Article Image

NY Times

Researchers believe they have found a second code in DNA in addition to the genetic code. The second code, superimposed on the first, sets the placement of the nucleosomes, miniature protein spools around which the DNA is looped. The spools both prot

Article Image

LiveScience.com

An evolutionary arms race between early snakes and mammals triggered the development of improved vision and large brains in primates, a radical new theory suggests. Snakes and primates share a long and intimate history, one that forced both groups to

Article Image

LiveScience.com

Cacti have can be found in rain forests and as far north as Canada. But it is their ability to thrive in the desert, where rain falls infrequently and unpredictably, that is their most remarkable trait. How do they do it? By working nights, usi

Article Image

LiveScience.com

It is the transparent part of the eye, but for scientists, its origin was anything but clear. Now researchers have pinpointed why the cornea, the thin covering that allows light into the eye, is completely see-through. The discovery could lead to pot

Article Image

Reuters

[Bush finally finds veto pen?!] The U.S. Senate strongly backed bipartisan legislation to expand federally funded embryonic stem cell research, but President Bush has vowed to veto the measure as morally indefensible. The vote was 63-37, four shor

Article Image

Financial Times

Now 21st-century technology is confirming his statement, as mining companies, spurred by high commodity prices, prepare to extract metal ore from rich deposits more than a kilometre under water.

Article Image

LiveScience.com

The triangular delta-wing shape found on many modern fighter jets was used by a small reptile to glide between trees 225 million years ago, a new study suggests. Sharovipteryx mirabilis is known from only a single fossil. It was about 8 inches lon

ppmsilvercosmetics.com/ERNEST/