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Science, Medicine and Technology

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AFP

Twelve footprints found in the bed of an ancient lake in northern Spain have thrown up the first compelling evidence that some land dinosaurs could swim. The prints paint a beguiling picture of a large, buoyant dinosaur whose clawed feet raked the se

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Reuters

"Just as the pigment chlorophyll converts sunlight into chemical energy that allows green plants to live and grow, our research suggests that melanin can use a different portion of the electromagnetic spectrum -- ionizing radiation -- to benefit

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LiveScience.com

Researchers have found that, at the molecular level, water exhibits viscous, even solid-like properties. When molecules of water are forced to move through a small gap between two solid surfaces, the substance's viscosity increases by a factor of

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by Robert Higgs for LewRockwell.com

Many writers who are not scientists themselves are trading on the prestige of science and the authority of scientists.

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Reuters

"We injected the cells into mice with damaged retinas due to diabetes or other eye injury. The cells migrated to the injured eye, and incorporated into the entire damaged vasculature. The cells are really smart, and amazingly, knew not to do any

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Jay Garbose video

You've heard of the Loch Ness Monster, the Creature from the Black Lagoon. The sea serpents of legend, right? A local diver says he's found something not even the Smithsonian can identify and it's right off the shores of Juno Beach.

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Playfuls.com

The University of Granada study of Gorham's cave on Gibraltar shows the Neanderthal extinction could have been determined by environmental and climate changes, and not by competitiveness with modern humans.

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LA Times

A fungus that caused widespread loss of bee colonies in Europe and Asia may be playing a crucial role in the mysterious phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder that is now wiping out bees across the U.S., University of California, San Francisco

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LiveScience.com

A giant mystery organism more than 350 million years old has finally been identified as a humongous fungus. The enigma known as Prototaxites, which stood in branchless, tree-like trunks up to more than 20 feet tall and a yard wide, lived worldwide fr

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Reuters

Cells that are supposed to nourish and support other nerve cells instead secrete the poisons that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, researchers reported.

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LiveScience.com

An adolescent female Tyrannosaurus rex died 68 million years ago, but its bones still contain intact soft tissue, including the oldest preserved proteins ever found. A comparison of the protein’s chemical structure to a slew of other species showed a

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LiveScience.com

Spiders love to fly. Hundreds can touch down in an acre of land on a day when conditions are right. And before casting out a silk thread and swooping miles through the air, a spider checks the weather just as a human pilot might do during a pre-fligh

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The Independent

Women might soon be able to produce sperm in a development that could allow lesbian couples to have their own biological daughters. Scientists want to produce synthetic sperm cells from a woman's bone marrow tissue after showing that it possible

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London Times

A gene that contributes to obesity has been identified for the first time, promising to explain why some people easily put on weight while others with similar lifestyles stay slim. People who inherit one version of the gene rather than another are

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Reuters

Four genes gang up together to help cancer spread throughout the body, researchers said, including one affected by arthritis drugs. And a second study found that 87 different genes work to help make cancer more vulnerable to drug treatment.

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LiveScience.com

A set of special eyes, similar to our own, keeps venomous box jellyfish from bumping into obstacles as they swim across the ocean floor. Unlike normal jellyfish, which drift in the ocean current, box jellyfish are active swimmers that can rapidly m

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LiveScience.com

Scientists have taken the temperature of Earth’s innards, more than a thousand miles beneath the surface, and found that the mercury there soars to about 6,650 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s nearly as steamy as our sun, where the surface reaches 9,980 de

midfest.info