Article Image
Radio/TV • Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock
Program Date:

01-27-15 -- Brent Murray - Jeremy Gillula (MP3 & VIDEO + BONUS LOADED)

Brent Murray (Co-Founder and CPO of The Foot Hammock) comes on the show to talk about an invention for your feet - Jeremy Gillula (Staff Technologist @ Electronic Frontier Foundation) talks about privacy, innovation, and creativity in the digital wor

Hour One

Media Type: Audio • Time: 217 Minutes and 0 Secs

 Hour 1 -- Freedom's Phoenix Headline News

 Hour 2 -- Brent Murray (Co-Founder and CPO of The Foot Hammock) comes on the show to talk about an invention for your feet

 Hour 3+BONUS -- Jeremy Gillula (Staff Technologist @ Electronic Frontier Foundation) talks about privacy, innovation, and creativity in the digital world and to get an update on where our civil liberties have been violated (or not violated), and upcoming legislation that may have an impact on these issues.

CALL IN TO SHOW: 602-264-2800

 

January 27th, 2015

Declare Your Independence with Ernest Hancock

on LRN.FM / Monday - Friday

9 a.m. - Noon (EST)

Studio Line: 602-264-2800 

 

Hour 1

2015-01-27 Hour 1 Freedom's Phoenix Headline News (Video Archive):

Ernest Hancock

Freedom's Phoenix Headline News


Hour Two

Guests: Brent Murray

Hour 2

2015-01-27 Hour 2 Brent Murray (Video Archive):

Brent Murray

Co-Founder and CPO of The Foot Hammock

Webpages:

http://signup.thefoothammock.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheFootHammock

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/325876977/the-foot-hammock

The Foot Hammock:

 


Hour Three

Guests: Jeremy Gillula

Hour 3

2015-01-27 Hour 3 + BONUS Jeremy Gillula

(Video Archive):

Jeremy Gillula

At a young age Jeremy was sidetracked from his ultimate goal of protecting digital civil liberties by the allure of building and programming robots, which was the focus of his work in college and grad school.  Having worked on drones and autonomous cars he is aware of their potential benefits for society, but is also that much more prepared to guard against the dangers they present to privacy and civil liberties.

Of course, having worked at EFF for nearly a year Jeremy has covered a wide variety of tech topics, including mobile devices, big data, and net neutrality, just to name a few.

A strong believer in never taking the straightforward path to anything, Jeremy went to Caltech for undergrad, then got his PhD in computer science from Stanford University by working on robotics projects with a professor in electrical engineering from UC Berkeley.

Staff Technologist @ Electronic Frontier Foundation

Webpage: https://www.eff.org/

To contact EFF, email them at info@eff.org

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF champions user privacy, free expression, and innovation through impact litigation, policy analysis, grassroots activism, and technology development. We work to ensure that rights and freedoms are enhanced and protected as our use of technology grows.

Even in the fledgling days of the Internet, EFF understood that protecting access to developing technology was central to advancing freedom for all. In the years that followed, EFF used our fiercely independent voice to clear the way for open source software, encryption, security research, file sharing tools, and a world of emerging technologies.

Today, EFF uses the unique expertise of leading technologists, activists, and attorneys in our efforts to defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, advocate for users and innovators, and support freedom-enhancing technologies.

Together, we forged a vast network of concerned members and partner organizations spanning the globe. EFF advises policymakers and educates the press and the public through comprehensive analysis, educational guides, activist workshops, and more. EFF empowers hundreds of thousands of individuals through our Action Center and has become a leading voice in online rights debates.

EFF is a donor-funded US 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that depends on your support to continue fighting for users.

Additional information:

Become an EFF member

View our annual reports and financial information

Historic EFF court victories

EFF's founding

_____________________________________________

TOPICS AND REFERENCES DURING INTERVIEW:

From Crossbows to Cryptography: Techno-Thwarting the State PDF

Chuck Hammill

weaponsrus@earthlink.net

Future  of Freedom Conference, November 1987

Public Domain:  Duplicate and Distribute Freely

You know, technology—and particularly computer technology—has often  gotten  a bad rap in Libertarian circles. We tend to think  of Or- well's 1984, or Terry Gilliam's Brazil, or the proximity detectors keep- ing East Berlin's  slave/citizens on their own side of the border, or the sophisticated  bugging devices Nixon used to harass those on his "ene- mies list." Or, we recognize that for the price of a ticket on the Concorde we can fly at twice the speed of sound, but only if we first walk through a magnetometer  run by a government  policeman,  and permit him to paw through  our belongings if it beeps.

But  I think  that mind-set is a  mistake.   Before there were cat- tle prods, governments tortured their prisoners with clubs and rubber hoses. Before there were lasers for eavesdropping, governments used binoculars and lip-readers.  Though government certainly uses technology to oppress, the evil lies not in the tools but in the wielder of the tools.

In  fact, technology represents one of the most promising avenues available for re-capturing our freedoms from those who have stolen them. By its  very nature, it favors the bright (who can put it to use) over the dull (who cannot).  It favors the adaptable (who are quick to see the merit of the new) over the sluggish (who cling to time-tested ways).  And what two better words are there to describe government bureaucracy than "dull" and "sluggish"?

One of the clearest, classic triumphs  of technology over tyranny I see is the invention of the man-portable crossbow. With it, an untrained peasant could now reliably and lethally engage a target  out to fifty me- ters – even if that target were a mounted, chain-mailed knight. Unlike the longbow, which, admittedly was more powerful, and could get off more shots per unit  time, the crossbow required no formal training to utilize.  Whereas the longbow required  elaborate visual, tactile and kinesthetic coordination to achieve any degree of accuracy, the wielder of a crossbow  could simply put the weapon to his shoulder, sight along the arrow itself, and be reasonably assured of hitting his target.

Moreover, since just about the only mounted knights likely  to visit your average peasant would  be government soldiers and tax collectors, the utility of the device was plain: With it, the common rabble could de- fend themselves  not only against  one another, but against their governmental masters. It was the medieval equivalent  of the armor-piercing bullet, and, consequently,  kings and priests (the medieval equivalent of a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Crossbows)  threatened death and excommunication, respectively, for its unlawful possession.

Looking at later developments, we see how technology like the firearm— particularly the repeating rifle and the handgun, later followed by the Gatling gun and more advanced machine guns – radically altered the balance of interpersonal and inter-group power.   Not without reason

was the Colt .45 called "the equalizer."  A frail  dance-hall hostess with one in her possession was now fully able to protect herself against the brawniest roughneck in any saloon. Advertisements  for the period also reflect the merchandising of the repeating cartridge rifle by declaring that "a man on horseback, armed with one of these rifles, simply cannot be captured."   And, as long as his captors were relying upon flintlocks or single-shot rifles, the quote is doubtless  a true one.

FOR FULL TEXT, CLICK ON PDF LINK ABOVE

_______________________________________________________

HTTPS Everywhere

Help us make HTTPS Everywhere better! Download the development version for Firefox.

HTTPS Everywhere is produced as a collaboration between The Tor Project and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Many sites on the web offer some limited support for encryption over HTTPS, but make it difficult to use. For instance, they may default to unencrypted HTTP, or fill encrypted pages with links that go back to the unencrypted site. The HTTPS Everywhere extension fixes these problems by using a clever technology to rewrite requests to these sites to HTTPS.

Information about how to access the project's Git repository and get involved in development is here.

Webmasters and prospective contributors: Check the HTTPS Everywhere Atlas to quickly see how existing HTTPS Everywhere rules affect sites you care about!

HTTPS Everywhere is governed by EFF's Privacy Policy for Software.

Read More About HTTPS Everywhere »

Questions and Caveats

Sadly, many sites still include a lot of content from third party domains that is not available over HTTPS. As always, if the browser's lock icon is broken or carries an exclamation mark, you may remain vulnerable to some adversaries that use active attacks or traffic analysis. However, the effort that would be required to eavesdrop on your browsing should still be usefully increased. Update: in recent versions of Firefox, Mozilla has removed the broken padlock indicator. Now, the only difference between a secure and insecure HTTPS deployment is the blue or green tint on the left of the address bar for secure deployments

Answers to common questions may be on the frequently asked questions page.

HTTPS Everywhere can protect you only when you're using sites that support HTTPS and for which HTTPS Everywhere include a ruleset. If sites you use don't support HTTPS, ask the site operators to add it; only the site operator is able to enable HTTPS. There is more information and instruction on how server operators can do that in the EFF article How to Deploy HTTPS Correctly.

Development And Writing your own Rulesets

Webmasters and prospective contributors: Check the HTTPS Everywhere Atlas to quickly see how existing HTTPS Everywhere rules affect sites you care about!

You can help us test forthcoming site support and new features by installing the development branch of the extension. HTTPS Everywhere uses small ruleset files to define which domains are redirected to https, and how. If you'd like to write your own ruleset, you can find out how to do that here. Information about how to access the project's Git repository and get involved in development is here. Send feedback on this project to the https-everywhere AT eff.org mailing list. Note that this is a public and publicly-archived mailing list. You can also subscribe. Send new rewrite rules or fixes to existing rewrite rules to the https-everywhere-rules AT eff.org mailing list. Note that this is a public and publicly-archived mailing list. You can also subscribe.

_______________________________________________________

HUMANCENTiPAD -- a mash up of Apple's iPad and horror film Human Centipede. It features Kyle and two other animated characters connected back to mouth in order to power Apple's newest tablet device, a job they inadvertently signed up for after signing Apple's user agreement without reading it.

HUMANCENTiPAD from Phantomas on Vimeo.

Join us on our Social Networks:

 

Share this page with your friends on your favorite social network:

Live Broadcasts


Get the LRN listening app
LRN.FM for Android and iOS!

Join our Telegram Channel


Please help fund Declare Your Independence with a one-time or recurring donation.



Archive By Year


Shows By Topic

Shows By Guest


thelibertyadvisor.com/declare