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arclein

Ho and his research team originally demonstrated the application of nanodiamonds for chemotherapeutic delivery and subsequently discovered that the nanodiamonds also are extremely effective at delivering therapeutic proteins. Their work further has shown that nanodiamonds can sustain delivery while enhancing their specificity as well.

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arclein

A smaller scale, economically efficient nuclear reactor that could be mass-assembled in factories and supply power for a medium-size city or military base has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories. The exportable, proliferation-resistant “right-sized reactor” was conceived by a Sandia research team led by Tom Sanders.

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www.reuters.com

 Worldwide demand for rare earths, covering 15 entries on the periodic table of elements, is expected to exceed supply by some 40,000 tonnes annually in several years unless major new production sources are developed. One promising U.S. source is a rare earths mine slated to reopen in California by 2012.

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NY Times

Much of the world knows Petra, the ancient ruin in modern-day Jordan that is celebrated in poetry as ''the rose-red city, 'half as old as time,''' and which provided the climactic backdrop for ''Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.''

But far fewer know Madain Saleh, a similarly spectacular treasure built by the same civilization, the Nabateans.

That's because it's in Saudi Arabia, where conservatives are deeply hostile to pagan, Jewish and Christian sites that predate the founding of Islam in the 7th century.

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BlueLoriBlogSpot

I doubt this will be available under obama care or now kennedy care (kennedy care which will inevitably become known as Kopechne Care) those forcibly enrolled in that plan will have the Diet Police and it will most likely be pretty expensive because the truth so many do not want to face is it takes years and lots of $$$ to develop these drugs so I assume it will be for the Elites. Something else to consider if not for the profit to continue research will new drugs that can truly aid mankind continue to be developed? In any case I thought this was quite interesting in that it has many other benefits in addition to the obvious. Discovery Of 'Fatostatin' A Turnoff For Fat Genes A small molecule earlier found to have both anti-fat and anti-cancer abilities works as a literal turnoff for fat-making genes, according to a new report in the August 28th issue of the journal Chemistry and Biology, a Cell Press journal.

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LiveScience

Nanostructures preserved in feather fossils more than 40 million years old show evidence that those feathers were once vivid and iridescent in color, paleontologists say.

Iridescence is the quality of changing color depending on the angle of observation — it's what makes you see a rainbow in an oil slick.

Many insects, such as butterflies, display iridescent colors on their wings, as do many modern birds on their feathers.

 

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Washington Post

Scientists have produced monkeys with genetic material from two mothers, an advance that could help women with some inherited diseases have healthy children but which would raise a host of safety, legal, ethical and social questions if attempted in people.

Using cloning-related techniques, the researchers developed a way to replace most of the genes in the eggs from one rhesus macaque monkey with those from another, fertilized the eggs with sperm, transferred the resulting embryos into animals' wombs and produced four apparently healthy offspring.

 

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arclein

Researchers in the US have found that firing a camera flash at graphite oxide is enough to make graphene – atom-thick sheets of carbon first discovered in 2004 that possess unique mechanical and electrical properties. The new process could also be used to make complex patterns of graphene that could be integrated into fast and flexible carbon-based electronic circuits.

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LiveScience

The body's appendix has long been thought of as nothing more than a worthless evolutionary artifact, good for nothing save a potentially lethal case of inflammation.

Now researchers suggest the appendix is a lot more than a useless remnant. Not only was it recently proposed to actually possess a critical function, but scientists now find it appears in nature a lot more often than before thought. And it's possible some of this organ's ancient uses could be recruited by physicians to help the human body fight disease more effectively.

 

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Radical Thought

The loud and heated health care debate seems to largely have two camps – those arguing in favor of socialized care, managed by the government; the other stubbornly, even emotionally resisting it, but having little else to add.

 Of those resisting it, it doesn’t seem that many are making productive suggestions that give American families much to noodle on if they rejected the socialized plan.

 That’s why I was so pleased to see Whole Food’s CEO, John Mackey’s Op Ed piece, “The Whole Foods Alternative to ObamaCare”, in the August 11th edition of the Wall Street Journal.

 

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LiveScience

A prehistoric runway for flying pterosaurs has been discovered for the first time.

Scientists uncovered the first known landing tracks of one of these extinct flying reptiles at a site dubbed "Pterosaur Beach," in the fine-grained limestone deposits of an ancient lagoon in southwestern France dating back some 140 million years ago to the Late Jurassic.

 

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AP

Scientists have discovered a gene that helps a mother and daughter stay alert on about six hours sleep a night, two hours less than the rest of their family needs.

It's believed to be a very rare mutation, not an excuse for the rest of us who stay up too late. But the finding, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, offers a new lead to study how sleep affects health.

 

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Washington Post

Make that under Wisconsin. Because the Earth is round, anyone wishing to send an object in a straight line from one spot on the planet to another spot 500 miles away must aim through the planet itself.

Here's where the really weird physics kick in: Neutrinos blast right through the Earth with nary a spark. They interact so rarely and so weakly with normal matter that they can zip right through solid rock as though it were not even there -- much like light through a clear glass window. That's why, contrary to the hopes of some private contractors who heard about a big new experiment under construction, Fermilab does not need to dig a tunnel underneath Wisconsin.

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arclein

This heating is much more efficient than can be explained by collisions of individual electrons, so must involve some instability or other collective phenomenon, but we have never been certain exactly what the mechanism is. Yadav showed that a rapidly oscillating electron beam can produce shock waves in an inhomogenous plasma that efficiently transfers energy to the plasma.

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arclein

An operating speed of close to 120 mph seems plausible and is a major challenge to other carriers. Add a thirty mph tail wind by skillful navigation and it is a quick trip to Chicago from LA. It appears everyone has made the connection between present truck load size and desirable air ship design. Once there are several designs in the air providing service, markets will be proven able to handle much larger sizes. That will lead naturally to mega sized craft able to handle several shipping containers.

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arclein

The achievement, unveiled in draft form in 2001 and finished in 2003, was hailed as one of humanity's major scientific achievements. Since then, sequencing "has become an order of magnitude cheaper and faster" every couple of years, said Lynda China, a medical researcher at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. In 2007, the firm 454 Life Sciences did it in under three months and for less than a million dollars.

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ARS Technica

Using supercritical fluids, researchers in the UK deposited 3nm copper wiring by infiltrating the fluid into porous SiO2. While commercial deployment depends on next-generation patterning methods, the process is highly extensible and scalable, making it a prime candidate for future device fabrication.

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NY Times

A growing body of research shows that people with red hair need larger doses of anesthesia and often are resistant to local pain blockers like Novocaine. As a result, redheads tend to be particularly nervous about dental procedures and are twice as likely to avoid going to the dentist as people with other hair colors.

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The Guardian

As well as being able to hold vast amounts of information, DNA is tough and flexible, making it an attractive candidate for use as a nanomaterial. Advances in molecular biology in recent decades have meant that scientists are well equipped to work with DNA and program it to do whatever they want.

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AFP

Sequencing the first human genome cost billions and required an army of scientists.  8 years later a trio of researchers in the US have matched that feat for the price mid-range BMW.   “This can be done in one lab, with one machine, and at a modest cost” of about $50,000, said Stanford University professor Stephen Quake, who designed the study and lent his DNA for the task.

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Technology Review

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have sealed silicon-nanowire transistors in a membrane similar to those that surround biological cells. These hybrid devices, which operate similarly to nerve cells, might be used to make better interfaces for prosthetic limbs and cochlear implants. They might also work well as biosensors for medical diagnostics.

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